Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Bel-Vick’s Anchor: The Angelus Arcade and The Arcadia Theatre — 1920s

arcadia-theater_exhibitors-herald-world_060730The 2000 block of Greenville Avenue, 1930… (click for larger image)

by Paula Bosse

I’ve written about the Arcadia Theatre before (here and here), but until I discovered the above photo from 1930, I’d never really thought about what had been on that site previously (the northwest corner of Greenville Avenue and Sears Street, now the home of a Trader Joe’s). There’s a lot going on in that photo, not the least of which is the fabulous Arcadia “tree” sign/marquee, made of sculpted concrete.

Greenville Avenue in the 1920s had a small business district with buildings clustered between Ross Avenue and Belmont, an area which many now call “Lowest Greenville” (the stretch of Greenville a little farther north which is now generally refered to as “Lower Greenville” was being developed but was not really an area of note yet — and “Upper Greenville” — which I don’t really hear people say anymore — was a rural highway which passed through small communities and was mostly surrounded by a lot of open farmland).

A look at city directories of the early 1920s suggests that business owners were trying to establish “Belmont” as the name of the area between Ross and Belmont, and many used the word in their business name (“The Belmont Pharmacy,” for instance). But things began to change in 1922 as development picked up, and “Belmont” suddenly became “Belmont-Vickery” (in a nod to the Vickery Place neighborhood), and then that very quickly became “Bel-Vick” or “Belvick” (a couple of rebel business owners went with “Belvic” but that didn’t seem to catch on). In the 1927 directory there were eight Belvick businesses, almost all of which were in the 1800 and 1900 blocks of Greenville, the blocks seen in the photo below (you can see the Arcadia “tree” in the distance on the left).

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Greenville Avenue, 1930 (Dallas Public Library)

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1927 Dallas directory

At least one business came up with a cutesy “Belvick” logo:

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Belvick Plumbing logo, 1928

(One of these businesses, Belvick Electric Co., ended up on Garland Road, owned by the family of “King of the Hill” writer and producer Jim Dauterive, a name which should be familiar to all “King of the Hill” fans; I wrote about that tidbit of hyper-trivia at the end of this post.)

There was even a small theater at 1804½ Greenville Ave. for a year or two, pre-dating the Arcadia by five years. The Belmont Theatre opened in Sept. 1922, but when it changed ownership a few months later it became, you guessed it, the Belvick Theatre. I hope patrons didn’t get too attached, because it was out of  business by the time the 1924 directory was published. Here’s what that building looked like in 2012 (sadly, it no longer looks anything like this) — the theater was, I believe, in the right half of the building.

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Google Street View, 2012

In 1923, a Greenville Avenue developer, Albert J. Klein, built a large building called the Angelus Arcade in the 2000 block of Greenville, at Sears Street. Here are a couple of woefully fuzzy classified ads for the under-construction “Greenville Market Place” and a list of the types of “first-class” businesses wanted to occupy the new arcade (click for larger-but-still-hard-to-read images).

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July, 1923

angelus-arcade_112823Nov., 1923

The arcade had several tenants and served as something of a public meeting place for the neighborhood — politicians frequently appeared in front of the large building to give speeches or talk to crowds in impromptu town-hall-like meetings. Like the use of “Belvick,” the name “Angelus” showed up in many of the less-than-imaginitively-named (first-class) businesses:

angelus-arcade_greenville-ave_1927-directory1927 Dallas directory

In 1927 Klein made a deal with the Dean Theatre company to build a new movie theater on the same premises as the Angelus — there would be additions and modifications made to the building, but it would still be home to several other businesses — there’d just be a movie theater inside. It would continue to be an “arcade.” Even though one newspaper article attempted to tie the name “Arcadia” to the new theater’s Italian garden motif which suggested a pastoral harmony with Nature, it seems more likely that people were already calling the building “the arcade,” and “Arcadia” was the next logical step.

The Arcadia Theatre opened on Nov. 4, 1927 with the Mary Astor movie “The Sunset Derby.” A newspaper report noted that “in spite of its remote location” the crowd-size was healthy. Patrons could even pop next door for a chicken dinner if so inclined.

arcadia-theater_exhibitors-herald-world_060928_front1928

One of the unusual things about the theater was the seating. The backs of the chairs were in a variety of colors (desert sand, cafe au lait, light blue, orchid, green, and “Chinese red”) which were placed in a randomly pattern throughout the auditorium. I think the operators probably thought this design-breakthrough was quirky and cutting edge, but it just looks a little odd. The Dallas Morning News described this feature as being reminiscent of a fun carnival; the Arcadia publicity person wrote that “the effect is as startling as it is pleasing.” …I’ll give you “startling.”

arcadia-theater_exhibitors-herald-world_060928_toward-screen1928

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Below are a few more images of the Arcadia Theatre through the years.

First, just an odd little postcard from 1934 which found its way into SMU’s archive — a drawing of that cool tree!

arcadia-sign_postcard_1934_cook-collection_degolyer-library_SMUvia George W. Cook Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU

arcadia-marquee_1941_ad-det1941

The Deco years, and a painfully pruned tree.

arcadia-theater_mcafee_degolyer_SMUvia DeGolyer Library, SMU

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There were a few fires over the years — here’s one from November, 1958.

arcadia_fire_nov-1958_portalDallas Firefighters Museum, via the Portal to Texas History

Eventually its days as a second-run suburban theater dwindled, and it became a live-music venue for a while in the 1980s, as seen in this absolutely fabulous photo from 1985 (Joan Jett played the Arcadia on June 13, 1985) taken by Dan Allen, owner of super-cool clothing boutique Assassins.

arcadia-theatre_june-1985_daniel-m-allen-photo_FB©Daniel M. Allen 2014, via Facebook

It also showed Spanish-language films for a few years.

arcadia_spanish-language-theater_dayvia American Classic Images

arcadia_spanish-language-theater_nightvia American Classic Images

But, ultimately, a fire ended it all, on June 21, 2006: 120 firefighters responded to a six-alarm blaze caused by a fire that originated in a restaurant — all the businesses in the block were destroyed.

arcadia_on-fire_2006via Cinema Treasures

Bel-Vick hasn’t been the same since. RIP, Angelus/Arcadia.

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Sources & Notes

Top photo from Exhibitors Herald World, June 7, 1930.

The 1930 view of Lowest Greenville, looking north from Alta, is from the Frank Rogers Collection, Dallas Public Library; titled “[Lower Greenville Avenue],” the call number is PA84-9/49.

The two photos from 1928 are from Exhibitors Herald World, June 9, 1928. To see the full 4-page article on the still-new Arcadia (with many photos of the interior) as well as a 2-page article from April 12, 1930 about how the Angelus Arcade building had been renovated to accommodate a theater — complete with floor plan — see a PDF here.

More on the Arcadia Theater — including additional photos of the ever-changing facade — can be found in these Flashback Dallas posts:

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I don’t usually post photos with watermarks, but I found these two really interesting photos of Greenville looking south from Sears, one from 1927 with buildings I’ve never seen, and one from 1930 with brand new buildings replacing those unfamiliar ones. Here’s the first, from 1927, which shows an unusual building with arches and a church (?!), Riggs Memorial Presbyterian Church, at the northeast corner of Greenville and Oram. (I used to have a little bookstore — Chelsea Books — at 1925 Greenville, in the space occupied by Criswell Furniture in this photo.)

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1927, Dallas Public Library, call number PA78-2/1047

chelsea-books_dallas_1925-greenville-avenue

And then, just three short years later… bye-bye, weird building and church. The buildings seen in the 1930 photo below are still standing (except for the gas station at the southwest corner at Sears). I love that this street has been immediately recognizable for decades, even though there has been some unfortunate architectural revision going on in ol’ Bel-Vick in recent years.

greenville-ave_south-from-sears_bud-biggs-collection_1930_DPL
1930, Dallas Public Library, call number PA84-9/48 

And here’s a detail from a 1931 Fairchild Aerial photo showing the Angelus/Arcadia at the center left (you can see the tree sign).

arcadia_fairchild-aerial_1931_detail_DPL
Dallas Public Library, call number
PA83-32/16 

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

Bright Lights, Big City — ca. 1948

elm-ervay-live-oak_weather-sign_ca-1948“Forget all your troubles, forget all your cares…”

by Paula Bosse

I think present-day downtown Dallas looks really great at night. But it pales in comparison to what downtown Dallas — especially Elm Street — used to look like at night. It was bursting with lights and signs and people. The scene above shows Elm Street looking east from Ervay around 1948. The Coca-Cola weather-forecast sign at the left is one of my favorite by-gone downtown landmarks (other photos of the sign can be seen here and here).

I wouldn’t really encourage anyone to click the link to see what this part of Elm Street looks like today, but if you must, it’s here.

Whenever I imagine times in Dallas history that I’d like to time-travel to, for some reason I always wish I could walk around downtown Dallas in the 1940s. It must have been quite something to have seen this pulsating view in person. 

elm-street_from-ervay-live-oak_1948-directory
Elm Street, 1948 directory (click to see larger image)

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Sources & Notes

I’m unsure of the source of this photo, but there is one almost identical to it in the collection of the Dallas Public Library, but the library’s copy is over-exposed and dated 1930 (it is titled “[Intersection of Elm, N. Ervay, and Live Oak streets]” and has the call number PA82-00324).

This photo was taken sometime between the end of 1947 and very early 1949. Mangel’s department store opened in its brand new building at 1700 Elm in September, 1947, and the Artificial Flower Shop (… “the artificial flower shop”?) lost its lease in early 1949. I can’t make out the lettering on the “Welcome” banners along the street, but there was a large hardware convention in Dallas in January, 1948.

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

The Crown Cork & Seal Co., Dallas Branch — ca. 1910

crown-cork-and-seal-co_cook-coll_degolyer-lib_SMUBicycle, boys, clerk, horse-anchor, horse, wagon…

by Paula Bosse

Above, the Dallas branch office of the Crown Cork & Seal Co. at 600 N. Akard (at San Jacinto), currently the location of the swank Dakota’s Steakhouse, across from the T. Boone Pickens YMCA.

The Baltimore-based Crown Cork & Seal Co. (their founder invented the bottle cap in 1892) opened its Dallas branch at this location around 1909 and remained in this building until about 1913 when they moved their plant to Pacific Avenue.

According to its Wikipedia entry, the company, now called Crown Holdings, manufactures “one out of every five beverage cans used in the world, and one out of every three food cans used in North America and Europe.” That’s a huge share of the market!

I don’t believe the company still has a Dallas branch — the last news I found was that the company was about to begin construction of a new building in the Trinity Industrial District in 1956 to house a regional office and warehouse.

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Sources & Notes

Photo is from the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU Libraries, Southern Methodist University; more info on this photo can be found here.

More on William Painter’s revolutionary bottle-cap invention (still in use today) can be found here.

crown-cork-and-seal-co_cook-coll_degolyer-lib_SMU_sm

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Paul Giraud’s 1892 View of Dallas with Trinity River “Improvements” Which Were Never Made

1892_map_birdseye_paul-giraud_wikimediaClick to explore a larger image…

by Paula Bosse

Above is a map titled “Dallas, Texas, With The Projected River And Navigation Improvements. Viewed From Above The Sister City of Oak Cliff.” It was a bird’s-eye view of the city drawn in 1892 by Dallas resident and businessman Paul Giraud.

If you click on the picture you will see a very large image which will allow you to look at all the tiny details. You’ll see a lot of stuff that never actually existed in Dallas, but which Giraud — an adamant and tireless proponent of a navigable Trinity waterway — hoped would become part of Dallas. It’s pretty cool and a lot of fun to wander through. (A good background history on Giraud’s “map” can be found on the Amon Carter Museum website here.)

Born in France in 1844, Paul Giraud settled in Dallas in 1890 where he worked both in real estate and as a draftsman while also acting as a booster of Dallas and Texas to anyone who would listen, especially to Europeans and fellow Frenchmen who were considering the possibility of emigrating to the United States. He was also an inventor and secured at least one patent.

Giraud’s enthusiasm and dedication for the Trinity River scheme could be found in the bird’s-eye view seen above, in a miniature three-dimensional model with working locks and dams which he constructed for the 1892 State Fair, and in newspaper articles printed across the state which he wrote to assure readers (and investors) of the feasibility of the project.

All that work, but, sadly, Giraud’s dream was never realized — the Trinity won. But he did leave us with that fantastic, partially realistic bird’s-eye view of the city.

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1892_map_birdseye_giraud_dmn_091892Dallas Morning News, Sept. 18, 1892

giraud_trinity-lock-and-dam-model_state-fair_dmn_102992
DMN, Oct. 29, 1892

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Souvenir Guide of Dallas, 1894

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giraud-paul_dmn_121117_obit
Photo and obituary, DMN, Dec. 11, 1917 (click to read)

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Sources & Notes

This map is in the collection of the Library of Congress, here; the picture at the top of this post links to the enlarged Wikimedia image here.

If you’d like to compare some of the buildings with Sanborn maps to see what was real and what was fanciful, you can find the 1892 Sanborn maps here (scroll down). It might be helpful to use Sheet 1 as a guide — if, for instance, you want to look at the area in the immediate vicinity of the courthouse (which was under construction at the time…), you see that you need Sheet 3, so you click on “Dallas 1892 Sheet 3” on the list of maps.

1892_map_birdseye_paul-giraud_wikimedia_sm

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Year-End List: Most Popular Posts of 2019

greenville-reservoir-house_jan-2018_paula-bosseMy “fixer-upper” dream house on Greenville Avenue…

by Paula Bosse

Another year is finally grinding to a close, and that means the appearance of one last “year-end” list, ranking the popularity of posts from the past year (one of which rather surprisingly shot up the list after having been posted only 8 days ago!).

As always, thank you to everyone who reads, comments, shares, and enjoys Flashback Dallas. I’ll be embarking on Year 7 in a couple of months, and I’m happy to say that I still enjoy writing about Dallas history as much now as I did when I started in 2014. Thanks to all of you for coming along for the ride.

Here are the most popular Flashback Dallas posts of 2019, starting with the most popular. To see each full post, click on the title; to see larger images, click on the picture.

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1.  “MY DREAM HOUSE AT THE GREENVILLE AVENUE RESERVOIR” (August)

The fact that this is the #1 post of 2019 amazes me. I see this little “house” all the time, and I have loved it since I was a child, when I dreamed of living in it, imagining it a huge, magical place inside — like Snoopy’s dog house. I guess others have also been fascinated with this very out-of-place little building at Greenville and Mockingbird. We should form a club. (And I kind of STILL want to live there!)

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majestic-hotel_portal_postcard2.  “THE MAJESTIC HOTEL / THE PARK HOTEL / THE AMBASSADOR HOTEL: R.I.P. — 1904-2019” (May) 

I wrote this the day the much-loved landmark in The Cedars burned down — luckily I had been collecting images of the hotel with the intention of one day writing about it and was ready when the disaster happened. I still haven’t driven past where the building used to stand. It had a good long run, but it still had many good years in it.

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3.  “CASA LINDA AERIALS — 1940s” (August) 

I love the main photo in this post which shows the Casa Linda Plaza shopping area at Garland Road and Buckner Boulevard before much of anything other than the theater had been built, with White Rock Lake and the still-in-operation firehouse in the background. As a lack of housing in post-war Dallas reached a crisis point, eastward expansion was inevitable. 

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4.  “BEAUTIFUL LAKE CLIFF — ca. 1906” (August)

This post is filled with pretty postcards that make a person feel incredibly nostalgic for a time and place they’ve never actually known. It would be nice to take a trip back to the Oak Cliff of a hundred or more years ago to visit the Lake Cliff seen in these postcards, in the days when it was one of the city’s most popular amusement destinations.

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5.  “THE LEGENDARY CHRISTMAS CARDS OF ANN RICHARDS AND BETTY McKOOL” (December)

This Christmas post — from last week! — catapulted to the fifth most popular post of the year. I think Ann and Betty would be happy with that — I know I am! (Incidentally, I’ve just added another card to the collection — I hope to add more as they become known to me — I’m aiming for a full set of images!)

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star-lounge_next-to-brannon-bldg_city-of-dallas-preservation-collection

6.  “THE STAR LOUNGE, 4311 BRYAN” (May)

I can’t say exactly what it is about this photo that everyone seems to love, but… everyone seems to love this photo. It helps that there is some interesting history in the 4300 block of Bryan, involving dynamite, extortion and racketeers in the 1930s, followed by a period of space-theme lounges in the ’60s, followed by adult bookstores in the ’70s. Old East Dallas has got it going on.

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7.  “RIP TORN AND ANN WEDGEWORTH’S DALLAS WEDDING — 1955” (July) 

I loved Rip Torn — if I see he’s in a movie, I’ll watch it — and I’m glad this post was so popular. Sometimes I feel like I’m playing “Six Degrees of Separation” when I hear news of the death of a notable person: I bet myself that I can find some sort of connection the Dearly Departed had with Dallas. I actually knew that Rip had ties to Dallas because I had previously written about actress Ann Wedgeworth and remembered that she had married Rip at what is now First United Methodist Church downtown. The old yearbook photos in the post are pretty great. R.I.P., Rip.

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8.  “GLORIA VANDERBILT’S 4 HUSBANDS… AND THEIR DALLAS CONNECTIONS” (June) 

I had employed that “Six Degrees of Separation” thing when I heard that Gloria Vanderbilt had died. It still surprises me, but I managed to connect each of her four husbands (Pat DiCicco, Leopold Stokowski, Sidney Lumet, and Wyatt Cooper) to Big D, which was a fun exercise and surprisingly interesting.

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roger-miller_venetian-room_oct-1969_wfaa_jones-film_SMU

9.  “SUPER-COOL ROGER MILLER IN DALLAS — 1960s” (October) 

I apparently share a love of Roger Miller with many of the readers of Flashback Dallas. This post, which includes a couple of video clips of Roger in Dallas, steadily racks up hits. His quipped response to a Channel 8 reporter’s question of whether he was “serious” when he wrote “You Can’t Roller Skate in a Buffalo Herd” is classic.

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10.  “TEMPLE EMANU-EL, AT THE ‘NORTHERN LIMITS OF DALLAS’ — 1957” (January) 

Photos of the brand-new location of the not-yet-landscaped Temple Emanu-El in North Dallas served as the springboard to write about this historic Jewish congregation founded in Dallas in 1873. The aerial photo from 1957 showing loads of empty land around Temple Emanu-El above Northwest Highway was one of my favorite photos posted in 2019.

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Below are the top 3 all-time most popular Flashback Dallas posts:

  1. “HOW TO ACCESS THE HISTORICAL DALLAS MORNING NEWS ARCHIVE” (2015)
  2. “BONNIE PARKER: ‘BURIED IN AN ICE-BLUE NEGLIGEE’ — 1934″ (2016)
  3. “CARHOPS AS SEX SYMBOLS — 1940” (2015)

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Sources & Notes

See all three 2019 “Best Of Flashback Dallas” lists here.

See all Flashback Dallas Year-End lists — past and present — here.

Thanks again for reading — may 2020 be a happy and productive year for us all!

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

Year-End List: My Favorite Posts of 2019

political-paranoia-2_1964_jones-collection_SMU_rockefeller-2Betty McKool onstage in “Political Paranoia II”

by Paula Bosse

2019 is finally dragging to a close. This has been a difficult year for me and my family as we have struggled with health issues involving an older relative. There were weeks which passed during which I wrote nothing here, which is unfortunate, because immersing myself in this blog — in the researching and the writing — is not only fun and satisfying, it’s also a good distraction when stress is ratcheting up pretty high. But things might be settling down a bit, and I hope to return to more regular posting in 2020. But as far as 2019, here are my personal favorite Flashback Dallas posts of the past year. (Pictures are larger when clicked; read original posts by clicking titles.)

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1.  “‘POLITICAL PARANOIA’ AND THE NORTH DALLAS DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB, FEAT. FUTURE GOVERNOR ANN RICHARDS” (December)

This is my favorite post of the year, partly because it has a personal connection to my family’s past, and partly because I had a role in identifying just what this 1964 film was and who some of the players were (including a politically active Dallas housewife who would go on to become governor of Texas). The film is an important find for reasons having to do with Texas history, Dallas history, Ann Richards history, Texas Democratic Party history, women’s history, and social and cultural history. And it’s just a fun snapshot of a very specific time in local politics. The screenshot above shows charismatic Betty McKool onstage as Nelson Rockefeller, a (very wealthy) Republican candidate for President in 1964. (Image source: G. William Jones Film and Video Archive, Hamon Library, SMU)

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2. “THE LEGENDARY CHRISTMAS CARDS OF ANN RICHARDS AND BETTY McKOOL” (December)

This post was the direct result of the “Political Paranoia” post — Betty McKool’s son saw it and sent me scans of many of the Christmas cards that his mother and her close friend Ann Richards created for years and which, even at the time, had attained a sort of legendary cult status. The ridiculous and irreverent cards were much anticipated every year. I never thought I’d ever be able to find more than a couple of them, but thanks to Mike McKool Jr., I’ve seen more than I ever expected to — and was able to share them! This post just made me happy. (Image source: Mike McKool Jr.)

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3.  “RUBBER STOCKPILE: FORTY-ONE MOUNTAINOUS PILES OF TIRES — 1943” (May)

I found an odd postcard on eBay showing armed guards standing in front of huge piles of tires. What’s with all those tires? Why were they being guarded by men with guns? And most importantly, where in Dallas was that mountain of tires? I loved diving in and researching this. I don’t know how interesting it was for people to actually read (and it was pretty long), but this was definitely one of the most fun research tasks I assigned myself all year. (Image source: eBay)

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4.  “THE GRAND ELM STREET ILLUMINATION — 1911” (June)

This is another one of those posts where I just really wanted to know the story behind an unusual-looking postcard. I did a ton of research on this forgotten “big moment” in Dallas history, and I loved it. (Image source: eBay)

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5.  “BURIED ALIVE AT THE FAIR PARK MIDWAY — 1946” (October)

And yet another instance of seeing an image and wondering “What is this?” and then plunging in to try to find out answers to all the questions I had. And, again, I loved it — I loved reading about this guy and his indisputably weird vocation. I posted this on Halloween because it’s kind of creepy, and I think I’m safe in saying that this post got fewer hits than any other thing I wrote all year! Hardly anyone clicked over to read it — I’m going to blame it on readers’ phobias and not my sparkling way with words! (Image source: George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU)

sfot_scotty-scott_buried-alive_coffin_cook-colln_degolyer-library_SMU_1946

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6.  “STONELEIGH PHARMACY / STONELEIGH P” (February)

A look at an old Dallas favorite which has had two separate identities. The Stoneleigh Pharmacy opened in 1923 as a sort of companion to the Stoneleigh Court hotel across the street and had a good long run, until 1980 when, sadly, it burned down — burned ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THE GROUND. But in 1981, the Stoneleigh P rose from the ashes and, thankfully, is still going strong. Long live the Stoneleigh P! (Image source: The Dallas Morning News, Oct. 14, 1923)

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7.  “THE ZODIAC ROOM” (May)

Other than a few Fortnight celebrations, I didn’t grow up popping into Neiman’s, so I knew not of the Zodiac Room, other than it was a place where elegant women went to have elegant foodstuffs like tea and cucumber sandwiches, and that Helen Corbitt (whom I knew only from seeing her name on a couple of my mother’s cookbooks) was somehow affiliated with it. I wrote about it mainly because I came across scans of the children’s menu on Instagram. As I wrote in the post, “My whimsy-threshold is pretty low, but I love the utterly charming drawings which grace the front and back covers…” — and that was more than enough reason to write about the famed Zodiac Room. (Image source: @reflectionofaman Instagram feed; artwork by Alma Shon)

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8.  “THE STAR LOUNGE, 4311 BRYAN” (May)

This is such a great photo — and this Old East Dallas block is still recognizable today, if not quite as interesting-looking. At one time this block contained several bars with Space-Age names: the Star Lounge, the Orbit Lounge, the Rocket Lounge, the Space Lounge, and the Apollo Lounge. That would have been the place to head to for some great (and probably delightfully seedy) bar-hopping! As I wistfully say to myself all the time while writing about Dallas’ bygone days, “Born too late, man — born too late.” (Image source: City of Dallas Historic Preservation Program archives)

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9.  “MICHAEL G. OWEN JR., DALLAS ARTIST” (November)

This is the fourth post I’ve written about Mike Owen. I’m not quite sure how that happened, but I now feel that, surely, I must be a Michael G. Owen Jr. expert! A large heretofore unknown painting by Owen — who is known mostly for his work as a sculptor — was to go up for auction, and that was the impetus for my writing this post about the little-known artist. (The painting sold for an amazing $228,000.) (Image source: David Dike Fine Art)

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10. “BEAUTIFUL LAKE CLIFF — ca. 1906” (August)

This post is made up almost entirely of lovely hand-colored postcards. It’s a shame places like this aren’t around anymore. (Image source: George W. Cook Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU)

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BONUS FAVE: “THANK YOU, CANDY’S DIRT! THANK YOU, PRESERVATION DALLAS!” (June)

A high point of 2019 for me was the totally unexpected announcement that I had been chosen to receive the 2019 Education Award from Preservation Dallas for my work on Flashback Dallas. It was very flattering to be acknowledged for the work I’ve done, but I hesitated about going to the awards ceremony because I’m a major introvert, and the prospect of being given an award — in public! — even if it was only one in a night filled with many awards — would cause some definite amount of anxiety and/or embarrassment. But I talked myself into it and went, and I’m so glad I did. First off, the event was held in the beautiful Lone Star Gas Building, which was fantastic (those elevators!). But more than that, going to the event gave me an opportunity to meet people who actually read the blog and who came up to me to tell me they were fans! You don’t get that very often when you do all your work alone at home. Social contact isn’t so bad after all! It was a wonderful night, and memories of it have helped keep my head above water as I’ve slogged through this difficult year. The very nice article about me by Deb Brimer, which she wrote for Candy’s Dirt, was also a wonderful boost. So, thank you, Deb, and thank you, Preservation Dallas! I’ve just uploaded a short video of the remarks about my award (me, me, me!) presented that night by David Preziosi, executive director of Preservation Dallas, here. (Image source: me!)

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I enjoyed writing all the posts that appeared on the blog this year, but these had some little extra something for me. How many of my favorites were also the readers’ favorites? That list will be posted tomorrow.

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Sources & Notes

See all three 2019 “Best Of Flashback Dallas” lists here.

See all Flashback Dallas Year-End lists — past and present — here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Year-End List: My Favorite Images Posted in 2019

braniff-poser_oil-well_ebay(Braniff Airways, Inc., Copyright 1926 2019)

by Paula Bosse

The end of the year means lists. Here are my favorite images — photos, postcards, artwork — posted in 2019. (All images are larger when clicked.)

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I love vintage travel posters, and the mid-century posters done for Braniff Airways are among my favorites (see a whole bunch here). The one above satisfies my love of this period of commercial art, as well as my love of Texas kitsch and, yes, oil-well imagery. It also happens to be one of the most recent additions to Flashback Dallas, having been posted only yesterday (!) in the post “Orphaned Factoids: Year-End Grab Bag, 2019.”

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The rest I’ll go through chronologically, starting with a 1955 photo by Joe Scherschel which was part of a Life magazine spread on the Republic National Bank Building, with several photos featuring the iconic “star” design seen on the embossed aluminum panels that cover the exterior of the building. The photo of the staff uniforms emblazoned with that design is just great — from the January post “Republic Bank Branding — 1955.”

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More Texas kitsch, from a Dallas Chamber of Commerce-approved matchbook cover, was seen in the January post “Enjoy That Dallas, Texas Hospitality.”

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I love aerial photos, especially ones that show huge expanses of undeveloped land in areas which are now heavily developed, like this one, also from Joe Scherschel of Life magazine, showing brand-new Temple Emanu-El in 1957, looking north from Northwest Highway, with an empty swath of North Dallas behind it. From the January post “Temple Emanu-El, At the ‘Northern Limits of Dallas’ — 1957.”

temple-emanu-el_life-mag_1957-aerial_crop

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I have fond (if somewhat vague) memories of the original Stoneleigh Pharmacy (now the Stoneleigh P, totally rebuilt after a fire), and I was very excited when I came across a photo of that block from its very earliest days in 1923. It’s a fuzzy, grainy, low-res photo from The Dallas Morning News, but just seeing it evokes a kind of Proustian response of instant nostalgia. From the February post “Stoneleigh Pharmacy / Stoneleigh P.”

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Another great aerial — this one from the 1940s showing the Casa Linda shopping center in East Dallas — showed up in the February post “Casa Linda Aerials — 1940s.

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In March I posted a photo of the first house I ever lived in which turns out to have been part of the historic Cole farm. The stone house was on Cole, near North Dallas High School, and my parents swore it was the coldest place they had ever lived. By serendipitous happenstance I was sent both a photo of the house around 1900 (seen below, from the Warlick family archives) as well as a photo of the house a few years before it was torn down — two photos I never thought I would see! From the post “My First Home — 3809 Cole Avenue.”

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This is a great drawing of a map of Dallas neighborhoods by artist Ashley Bond (whom, I discovered, was the father of “Tommy” from the Our Gang/Little Rascals comedies) — it appeared in a Dallas Chamber of Commerce publication. From the March post “‘Birdseye View of Greater Dallas’ by Ashley Bond — 1925.”

birds-eye-view-greater-dallas_DCoC-1925_ashley-bond

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This photo of a block of Bryan Street in Old East Dallas is just fantastic. It is from the City of Dallas Historic Preservation Program archives and was featured in the May post “The Star Lounge, 4311 Bryan.”

star-lounge_next-to-brannon-bldg_city-of-dallas-preservation-collection

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Also from May, a photo of the last location of The Aldredge Book Store, my father’s store on Maple Avenue. The building was demolished a few years ago to make room for a driveway for the next-door Stoneleigh Hotel, and this is one of the only pictures I have of the place. The photo was taken by my brother, Erik Bosse, and was featured in the post “The Aldredge Book Store — 2909 Maple Avenue.”

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The 115-year-old Ambassador Hotel burned down in May — I wrote a post which contained a lot of old postcards of the building in its various incarnations, and this postcard from its time as the Park Hotel is my favorite, with the Hughes Brothers building on the left, the hotel in the center, and City Park on the right. From the post “The Majestic Hotel/The Park Hotel/The Ambassador Hotel: R.I.P. — 1904-2019.”

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I love odd photos and postcards where you’re staring at them, shaking your head, and saying “What am I looking at here?” This is one of those images. I loved researching this moody commemoration of the lighting of Elm Street’s new streetlights in 1911 — another instance where wondering what something is leads to learning about a really interesting forgotten piece of history. From the June post “The Grand Elm Street Illumination — 1911.”

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Maybe it’s the pinks and greens and lush feel of this very “pretty” image, but I really love this Butler Brothers postcard. From the June post “Butler Brothers Building, As Seen From the Praetorian.”

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I had no idea there was a Wilson Building Jr. This great postcard was featured in the July post “The Wilson Building and the *New* Wilson Building — 1911.”

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I wrote about actor Rip Torn and his Dallas connections when he died in July. One of the photos I included was the one below of his first-cousin, Sissy Spacek, from the 1968 Quitman High School yearbook, showing her looking mod and groovy (and mostly unrecognizable). From the post “Rip Torn and Ann Wedgeworth’s Dallas Wedding — 1955.”

spacek-sissy_quitman-high-school_senior-photo_1968_cutest-couple

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Also from July was this cool postcard of the Magnolia Building, from the post “Urban Landscape with Biplane.” All that’s missing is King Kong.

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My “dream house” is a small industrial building at Mockingbird and Greenville made to look like a small house. I’ve loved it my whole life and took this photo several years ago. From the August post “My Dream House at the Greenville Avenue Reservoir.

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I’m not sure why I love this Methodist Hospital postcard so much, but I do. From the November post “A Few Random Postcards.”

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And there were two photos I really liked which I came across this year and added to older posts.

This appropriately eccentric photo of Salvador Dali at Union Station in 1952 is from the Hayes Collection at the Dallas Public Library and was added to the 2015 post “Salvador Dali Brings ‘Nuclear Mysticism’ to Dallas — 1952.”

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And this photo of the MKT passenger depot, formerly at Ross and Market was added to the 2014 post “Leaving Dallas on the Katy Flyer — ca. 1914.”

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That does it for my 2019 image faves!

Lists of my favorite posts of the year and the most popular posts of the year are coming soon!

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Sources &  Notes

See all three 2019 “Best Of Flashback Dallas” lists here.

See all Flashback Dallas Year-End lists — past and present — here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

Orphaned Factoids: Year-End Grab Bag, 2019

cyclone-twister_tornado_cigars_1928_ebay“Looks crooked but smokes straight…”

by Paula Bosse

As another year crawls to an end, it’s time to collect the odd bits and pieces that have  piled up over the past few months which struck me as interesting or funny or… whatever. I had nowhere else to put them, so they’re going here! (Most images are larger when clicked.)

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First up, the ad above for the “Cyclone Twister” 5-cent cigar, distributed by Dallas wholesaler Martin L. Richards in 1928. Note the shape of the cigar. “Looks crooked but smokes straight.” Probably looked a little strange when smoked. I guess it might help break the ice at parties. Found on eBay.

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Here’s a nice little crest for SMU I’ve never seen — I’m not sure how long this lasted. From the 1916 Rotunda yearbook.

smu_crest_1916-rotunda

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M. Benedikt & Co. was the “Headquarters for Hard-to-fit-men” — in other words, they specialized in “Right-Shape clothing for Odd-Shape Men.” Here are a couple of examples of what they might consider “odd-shape men” in an ad from 1899.

benedikt-clothiers_odd-shape-men_dallas-fire-dept-souvenir_1899_degolyer-lib_SMU

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This is an interesting selection of ads from a 1968 edition of the Yellow Pages: Dewey Groom’s Longhorn Ballroom, Louanns, El Zarape Ballroom, the It’ll Do Club, the Bamboo Room at the Tower Hotel Courts, the Chalet Club, and the Tamlo Show Lounge (a couple of these show up in the…um… informative story “The Meanest Bars in Dallas” (D Magazine, July, 1975).

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I’ve been working in the G. William Jones Film and Video Archives at SMU for the past few months, and this was something I came across while viewing a 1960 WFAA-Channel 8 News clip which made me really excited (it’s an awful screenshot, but, what the heck): while covering a car wreck at Corinth and Industrial, the Ch. 8 camera panned across the scene, and in the background, just left of center, was a very tall sign for the Longhorn Ranch, which I’d never seen before. Before it was the Longhorn Ranch it was Bob Wills’ Ranch House, and after it was the Longhorn Ranch it was the Longhorn Ballroom (more history of the legendary honky-tonk is in a Texas Monthly article here). So, anyway, it’s a fuzzy screenshot, but I think it’s cool. (The footage is from June, 1960 but the clip hasn’t yet been uploaded online.)

longhorn-ranch_wfaa-june-1960_jones-film_SMU

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Speaking of WFAA footage in the Jones Film collection, there was some sort of story about comely young women in skimpy outfits handing out samples of some sort of food to passing pedestrians on Commerce Street (the one-minute clip is here). In addition to seeing sights associated with downtown streets in 1962 (including businesses such as Sigel’s and the Horseshoe Bar, as well as a large sign advertising the Theatre Lounge), I was really happy to see a few Braniff Airways posters in a window — I love those late-’50s/early-’60s Braniff travel posters! So here’s another screenshot and, below that, the Texas-kitsch poster I was so happy to see in color.

braniff-poser_oil-well_jones-film_SMU_041262

braniff-poser_oil-well_ebayBraniff Airways, Inc., Copyright 1926 2019

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I don’t have an image for it, but I was amused to learn that in 1969 the powers-that-be at the Texas Turnpike Authority nixed the suggestion that the Dallas North Tollway be renamed in honor of president Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had recently died — the idea was turned down because 1) new signage would have been very expensive, and 2) officials were afraid that “irreverent motorists” would inevitably refer to the toll road as the “Ike Pike” (I know I would have!).

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Not Dallas, but there’s always time for a little love for Fort Worth: here’s a nice ad from 1955 for a 22-year-old Fort Worth DJ named Willie Nelson, back when he was gigging out on the Jacksboro Highway with his band the Dumplin’ Eaters.

nelson-wilie_FWST_090955Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Sept. 9, 1955

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Apparently there was a time when ladies were uncomfortable patronizing an establishment in which m*n served them ice cream, so this ad from 1899 made sure to note that “lady clerks” were in attendance. (See the back side of the Willett & Haney Confectioners parlor a couple of years before this ad, when the “cool and cozy parlor” was located on Main Street — it’s at the far left in this circa-1895 photo detail from this post.) The parlor was owned by John B. Willett and John S. Haney, and in addition to ice cream and candy, their specialty was oysters, and I can only hope that there was some experimenting with new food combos involving mollusks, ice cream sodas, and crushed fruit.

willett-and-haney_ice-cream-parlor_dallas-fire-dept-souvenir_1899_degolyer-lib_SMU

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This is an odd little tidbit from The Dallas Morning News about a couple of cadets from Camp Dick (at Fair Park) and what happened to them when they attended a lecture on “social diseases.” (The jokes write themselves….) Who knew singing and whistling were so therapeutic”

camp-dick_dmn_081718DMN, Aug. 17, 1918

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The caption for this photo (which appeared in the article “Going Downtown to Shop” by Jackie McElhaney, from the Spring, 2009 issue of Legacies): “In 1946, Sanger’s introduced a portable drapery shop. Two seamstresses sewed draperies in this truck while parked in the customer’s driveway.” Now that’s service!

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“Forward with Texas,” 1947 ad detail

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Two more. This first was a real-photo postcard I found on eBay. It shows the Pink Elephant cafe on Hwy. 80 in Forney (not Dallas, but pretty close!). I love the idea of Forney having a place called the Pink Elephant — it was quite popular and was in business from at least the 1930s to the 1950s. The card below was postmarked in 1936.

pink-elephant-bbq_forney_ebay_mailed-1936

This photo of the interior is from the Spellman Museum of Forney Museum Facebook page.

pink-elephant-bbq_forney_FB_spellman-museum-forney-history

I wondered if the place was still around (sadly, it is not), and in looking for info about it found this interesting article from 1934 about outlaw Raymond Hamilton, the escaped killer who grew up in Dallas (…there’s the Dallas connection!) and was notorious for having been a member of Bonnie and Clyde’s “Barrow Gang.” (Click to read.)

pink-elephant-bbq_forney_austin-american_102234Austin American, Oct. 22, 1934

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And, lastly, a photo of a young woman which appeared in a German-language magazine, captioned simply “Eine Texas Schönheit (A Texas Beauty).” Is the hair wearing the hat, or is the hat wearing the hair?

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Previous installments of Flashback Dallas “Orphaned Factoids” can be found here.

Until next year!

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

The Legendary Christmas Cards of Ann Richards and Betty McKool

xmas_ann-richards_betty-mckool_1973_detFrom the personal collection of Mike McKool Jr., used with permission

by Paula Bosse

Ann Richards and Betty McKool were close friends in Dallas in the 1960s, sharing an offbeat sense of humor and a dedication to Democratic-party politics. They were founders of the North Dallas Democratic Women’s Club which was widely known for its revue of political humor and song parodies called “Political Paranoia” which Ann and Betty both performed in, wowing audiences with their larger-than-life charisma.

In the late ’60s, Ann and Betty — who loved dressing in ridiculous costumes and cracking each other up — began to issue satirical Christmas cards which featured photographs of themselves in outrageous situations accompanied by pithy captions and greetings, usually referencing a political hot-topic of the past year. The cards were sent out unsigned, and, as Ann Richards wrote in her autobiography Straight from Heart, not everyone knew who had sent them.

We mailed these to a lot of people, maybe a hundred, and we didn’t sign them. And we had such a good time thinking about people getting this weird card and trying to figure out who it could possibly be from, thinking maybe it was their wives’ relatives. Oh, we laughed about that. And we kept thinking of some guy opening it and drawling, “Mildred come here, look at this card we got in the mail.” No more than half our friends recognized us, maybe not that many.

Ann and Betty enjoyed doing the first card so much that they did it every year — it became something of an institution, and people on the Christmas card list waited expectantly each Christmas to get the latest crazy card. It was definitely a high point of the holiday season and the most anticipated Christmas card of the year. I certainly remember hearing about them throughout my childhood, as my parents were lucky enough to be on The List.

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In her autobiography, Ann wrote that “our Christmas photo album lasted nine years” which is incorrect. After I wrote the post “‘Political Paranoia’ and the North Dallas Democratic Women’s Club, feat. Future Governor Ann Richards,” (which contains the newly unearthed film of “Political Paranoia II” from 1964 in which both Ann and Betty have standout performances), I received an email from Vicki Byers who is the Executive Assistant to Mike McKool Jr. (Betty’s son). That email contained scans of 12 of the Christmas cards from Mr. McKool’s personal collection! Wow! And he has allowed me to share these cards which have attained something of an almost mythic status — followers and fans of Gov. Richards have read about them, but not a lot of them have actually ever seen them. So thank you, Vicki, and thank you, Mike, for allowing access to this little treasure trove!

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I’m not sure on the exact chronology of these cards. In her book, Ann writes about the “Temperance” card as being the first one that she and Betty did, but Mr. McKool has that card as being from 1976. It’s parodying a 1964 quote from Barry Goldwater, so it seems more likely to have been issued in the ’60s than in the ’70s — possibly in 1968. The cards were issued as late as 1983, and at some point the cards became posters. Ann moved from Dallas to Austin in 1969 or 1970, so she and Betty would have had to meet up during the year to plan and pose for their annual Christmas card, and from all accounts, the two women truly enjoyed creating the irreverent cards as much as people enjoyed receiving them. Here they are (all images are larger when clicked).

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1969: “Merry Christmas… From the Silent Majority”

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1970: “Wishing You Season’s Greetings from the Valley Forge Chapter of Women’s Liberation and a Gay Holiday… From the Boys in the Band”

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1971: “Hark!… It’s a Girl!”

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1972: “Adoremus (Let Us Adore Him)… Four More Years”

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1973: “Let Me Make This Perfectly Clear… — You’re getting the same thing for Christmas that you’ve been getting all year!”

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1974: “And it came to pass… — Wisepersons????”

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1976 [?]: “From Our House To Your House — A Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year… Extremism in the pursuit of a Merry Christmas is no sin.” (In her autobiography, Ann describes this “Temperance” card as being the first one she and Betty made — it’s possible this might be from 1968.)

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1977: ‘Twas the night before Christmas…When what to my wondering eyes should appear but… Bella Abzug!”

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1978: “Good grief! …WHO CAN WE TURN TO FOR HELP?”

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1979: “The honour of your presence is requested for Christmas Luncheon at The Governor’s Mansion”

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1980: “The White House Cookbook — Nancy Reagan’s All American Turkey”

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1981 [No image available, but in a mention in the Austin American-Statesman, Ann and Betty are described as being “dressed as old hoboes, looking aghast” in a “poster-sized card,” commenting on the theory of trickle-down economics]: “Behold, I Bring You Tidings of Great Joy… In other words, the rich get richer and we get trickled down on!”

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1982: “The good new is We Won! — The bad news is… You got to dance with them that brung ya!”

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1983: “Dear Ronnie: I would have put the gender gap in your stocking but it was too big. Love, Mrs. Claus” (issued as a poster; from the collection of Frances Murrah, Betty’s sister)

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There was also a card about which Ann wrote this: “Another year we donned cowboy hats and glittering western wear, and sent ‘Greetings from the Rhinestone Cow Chips.'” The Glen Campbell song “Rhinestone Cowboy” came out in 1975. The photo below appeared in Jan Reid’s book Let the People In: The Life and Times of Ann Richards, and I suspect it might have been sent out as the 1975 card.

xmas_ann-richards_betty-mckool_nd_ca-1975

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And one other card was described by Ann in her book: “One of my favorites was when we hung a bunch of stuffed deer heads, like you see on the wall of a lodge, and cut holes where we could stick our heads through and put on these antlers. And the message was, ‘If you think I’m gonna pull that damned old sleigh one more year….'” (Could this perhaps have been issued in 1976?)

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So that’s at least 16 Christmas cards (a few were posters) sent out by Ann Richards and Betty McKool. And people are still talking about them! (I would love to be able to add other Ann-and-Betty cards to this post — if you have scans of any of the missing cards/posters, or any additional information, please let me know!)

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Dorothy Ann Willis Richards was born in McLennan County in 1933 and grew up in Waco. Here is a lovely photo of her from 1950, from the “Favorites” section of the Waco High School yearbook. She was in the class play and was a debate champion. She lived in Dallas for several years where she was very active in Democratic politics as an activist and volunteer; after moving to Austin she entered politics as an elected official and ultimately became Governor of Texas in 1991. She died in 2006.

richards-ann_waco-high-school_1950_favoritesAnn, Waco High School, 1950

political-paranoia-2_1964_jones-collection_SMU_lbj_ann-richards-3
Ann as LBJ, “Political Paranoia,” Dallas, 1964

Elizabeth Ann “Betty” Raney McKool was born in Dallas in 1929. She attended Crozier Tech High School (below is a class photo from the 1946 yearbook) where she was a cheerleader. She married Mike McKool when she was only 16, and the two were extremely well known in political circles. Mike McKool, an attorney, served as a State Senator in Austin and was a Democratic Party leader in Dallas. Betty died in 2018 (read her obituary here). There is a fantastic interview with her from a 1971 “Legislative Wives” series in the Austin American-Statesman here.

mckool-betty-raney_crozier-tech_1946Betty, Crozier Tech, 1946

political-paranoia-2_1964_jones-collection_SMU_rockefeller-2
Betty as Nelson Rockefeller, “Political Paranoia,” Dallas, 1964

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On behalf of Ann Richards and Betty McKool, I wish you all a (bemused and slightly aghast) very Merry Christmas!

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Sources & Notes

Thanks to Mike McKool Jr. and Vicki Byers for sending me the color images; these Christmas cards are from Mr. McKool’s personal collection, and I am grateful for his permission to share them here.

Also, many thanks to the family of Betty’s sister Frances Murrah, who allowed me to share the “Nutcracker” poster from 1983; Frances worked with Senator Lloyd Bentsen in Washington, DC for several years.

Quoted passages are from Chapter 7 of the book Straight from the Heart, My Life in Politics & Other Places by Ann Richards (Simon & Schuster, 1989). You can read these pages on Google Books here.

Screenshots are from the 1964 film “Political Paranoia II” from the G. William Jones Film and Video Archive, Hamon Library, Southern Methodist University; this film may be viewed on YouTube in its entirety here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

Christmastime at Booker T. Washington High School — 1950s

booker-t-wash_xmas-decDecking the halls…

by Paula Bosse

Most of us have fond memories of holiday-themed activities in school — here are a few photos from the Christmas season at Booker T. Washington High School in the early ’50s.

Above, girls hang decorations on the office door.

Below, the Library Club poses for a photo at a Christmas party (all photos are larger when clicked).

booker-t-wash_xmas-party_1952via John Leslie Patton Papers, Dallas Historical Society

And the bottom two photos show members of the Booker T. Washington chapter of the American Junior Red Cross standing with the articles they’ve made and/or collected for distribution to various hospitals and institutions — a couple of girls can be seen crocheting and knitting items which will be added to the collection of things destined for grateful recipients.

booker-t-wash_xmas-red-crossvia John Leslie Patton Papers, Dallas Historical Society

And below, Mrs. Catherine Robinson, the organization’s sponsor, stands with students and their gift-wrapped presents which are ready to be delivered to places such as the Hutchins Home for Convalescent Patients, Woodlawn and Parkland Hospitals, orphanages, boarding homes for juvenile wards of the state, and even to the leprosarium in Carville, Louisiana (a hospital which treated leprosy patients — a 1953 newspaper article reported that most of the then-current 400 patients were from Texas).

booker-t-wash_xmas-red-cross2via John Leslie Patton Papers, Dallas Historical Society

Organized in 1917, the American Junior Red Cross had Dallas chapters in most — if not all — schools by 1918, including Booker T. Washington. By 1949 Dallas County had Jr. Red Cross chapters in 183 schools, with more than 78,000 students taking part; they made and/or collected 30,000 items that year which were distributed to active servicemen, to hospitalized veterans and children, to the needy, and to the aged. There were regular collection drives for reading material (elementary kids donated a LOT of comic books!), and there were regular visits to hospitals, etc., to entertain and perform (“except in times of polio epidemics”). Students also wrote letters to military personnel and to children in other countries and were trained in safety and first-aid procedures..

american-junior-red-cross_poster_1952_vintageposterworksvia Vintage Poster Works

Because of the efforts of Junior Red Cross members like these from Booker T. Washington High School, many who were convalescing, lonely, or in need were assured a happier Christmas than they might otherwise have had.

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Sources & Notes

All photos of Booker T. Washington High School students are from the John Leslie Patton Papers collection of the Dallas Historical Society. (More on Patton, the legendary principal of Booker T. Washington for 30 years can be found at the Handbook of Texas site here.)

More on the American Junior Red Cross can be found in these articles:

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

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