Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Thanks-Giving Square — 1976

thanks-giving-square_thanksgiving-square_1976_postcard_ebay

by Paula Bosse

Happy Thanksgiving! It seems like a good day to look back at Thanks-Giving Square, the triangular one-acre park in downtown Dallas bounded by Pacific, Bryan, and Ervay. It was originally envisioned in 1961 by Dallas businessman Peter Stewart as a needed quiet refuge and chapel in the middle of a busy city — a calm space set aside for “spiritual gratitude.” It took several years before architect Philip Johnson was brought on to the project in 1971. After more than 15 years from its original conception, its official public dedication was on Nov. 28, 1976, three days after Thanksgiving.

Check out some of the progress reports on the project which appeared over the years on WFAA-Channel 8 News:

Architect Philip Johnson (whose other Dallas projects include the Kennedy Memorial, The Crescent, and the Cathedral of Hope, etc.) talks briefly about Thanks-Giving Square and its underground component, and also shows off a 3-D model (from July 1971):

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Business owners whose shops were in buildings on the land which was about to be leveled were forced to move out, and many were not happy (from April 1972):

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Construction is underway (November 1976):

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And, lastly, Channel 8 weatherman Troy Dungan checks out the progress as the dedication day approaches (November 1976):

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For a bit of street-level context, here’s a photo showing some of the buildings that were razed (at the right, directly across from the Republic Bank Building) in order to make way for Thanks-Giving Square:

kodachrome_bryan-n-ervay_1954_shorpyvia Shorpy.com

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Below is a detail from a newspaper ad for MetroBank which appeared in August, 1976, with a nice little stylized illustration of the triangular TGS and its swirly chapel (click for larger image).

thanks-giving-square_metrobank-ad_det_080276

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Speaking of the “swirly” design, in a 1982 article about TGS, Dallas Morning News architect deity David Dillon described this structure as “Philip Johnson’s Dairy Queen chapel,” which, presumably, might not have been met with amusement by internationally acclaimed architect Johnson, who probably wouldn’t have appreciated the comparison of his work to an ice cream cone. Interestingly, that description appeared in a 1982 article about Stewart’s dismay that the tall buildings which loomed over TGS (including Thanksgiving Tower) were, basically, blotting out the sun — little TGS was more often in shadow than in sunlight:

Stewart urged the city to pass a sun and shadow ordinance that would preserve the remaining downtown view corridors from high-rise development […] but the [preliminary] ordinance got such a cool reception from downtown developers that it was dropped quickly. (“Computer Study Sheds Light On Thanks-Giving Square Problem” by David Dillon, Dallas Morning News, July 4, 1982)

I bet it got a cool reception!

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Sources & Notes

Postcard found on eBay.

Videos from SMU’s WFAA News Film Collection, which can be found on the SMU Jones Film Collection YouTube channel.

Thanks to Noah Jeppson for passing along a link to the huge Thanks-Giving Foundation Collection of photos and documents, viewable on the University of North Texas’ Portal to Texas History, here.

Read about the history of Thanks-Giving Square (or as it’s often written, Thanksgiving Square) on Wikipedia, here.

Read the D Magazine article “The Park That Peter Built” (which seems to end abruptly) about the history of Thanks-Giving Square by Jane Sumner from Nov. 1, 1977 here.

thanks-giving-square_thanksgiving-square_1976_postcard_ebay_sm

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Highland Park High School Rodeo Club — 1973

rodeo_HPHS-yrbk_1973

by Paula Bosse

HPHS had a rodeo team? It was apparently a thing, at least in 1973 — they even participated in the Fat Stock Show in Fort Worth.

Seeing as these are Highland Park students, I can only imagine the guys seen above ultimately became partners in a law firm called Barton, O’Connor, Rohlfs, Goss, Bibby & Fitch.

There were other “rodeo” mentions in the yearbook, including this double-page ad which read “The Original Highland Park Rodeo Club.” I mean, kids are wearing t-shirts. I don’t know whether this was an elaborate “ironic” put-on, or whether it was real, but, I have to say, either way, I’m a fan!

rodeo_original-roadeo_HPHS_1973_a

rodeo_original-roadeo_HPHS_1973_b

rodeo_HPHS_1973_det

rodeo_HPHS_1973

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Sources & Notes

Photos from the 1973 Highland Park High School yearbook, The Highlander.

rodeo_HPHS-yrbk_1973_sm

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Photo Additions To Past Posts — #18

kodachrome_downtown_ebayBig D Kodachrome

by Paula Bosse

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these, so why not now? These are things I’ve collected over the past months which I am now adding to old posts in order to keep everything together.

The first is the color photo above, showing the super-fab Walgreens at the corner of Commerce and Akard (see my favorite photo of it in this post), with the view looking north on Akard. I’ve added it to the 2021 post “Downtown Dallas in Color — 1940s & 1950s.” (Source: eBay)

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I’ve added some text and a couple of photos about Ernest Oates, the Englishman who brought soccer to Dallas, to the 2014 post “The Dallas Athletics, Dallas’ First Soccer Team — 1908.” (Source, 1922 Dallas city directory)

ad-oates-stone-work_1922-directory

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I’ve added this 1961 ad to the perhaps-too-exhaustingly-exhaustive post from 2018, “Sam Ventura’s Italian Village, Oak Lawn.” (Source: Diane Wisdom Papers, Archives of Women of the Southwest, DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)

italian-village_dallas-entertainment-awards_1961_SMU

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I try to avoid posting photos with watermarks, but I love this, so I’ve added it to one of my favorite posts, “Ghost Rails of the Belmont Streetcar Line” from 2018. It shows a Belmont car in front of the Palace Theatre at Elm and Ervay. The marquee shows that “New Moon” — starring Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy — is playing. “New Moon” opened at the Palace on July 4, 1940 and ran for a week. (Source: eBay)

belmont-streetcar_new-moon_1940_palace_ebay

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Do people still say “funeral parlor”? This ad from 1937 for the Weever Funeral Home has been added to the 2015 post “Not Dead Yet at McKinney & Routh.” The building at 2533 McKinney was built in 1927 and was a strikingly beautiful (and pricey) funeral home — it’s still standing and has been occupied in recent years by a string of Uptown restaurants. This ad proudly notes that “Weever advertises his prices” — he is completely transparent about the fact that the price of a silver-plated casket is gonna set you back $2,250 (the equivalent in today’s money of $45,000). Can’t say you weren’t warned. (Source: 1937 Dallas city directory)

weever-funeral-home_1937-city-directory_ad

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These two photos have to do with a concrete house built in University Park around 1914 (I was kind of obsessed with it a few years ago). They have been added to the 2018 post “Dallas in ‘The Western Architect,’ 1914: Park Cities Residences” (this is one in a ridiculously crammed-full-of-information 7-part series I wrote about buildings featured in an architectural journal — I  probably learned more about early-20th-century buildings in Dallas from researching and writing those posts than from anything else I’ve done). The first photo (the concrete house, looking a lot less dynamic than when it was brand new) was taken around 1931; the second photo (the Presley Apartments, which replaced the concrete house when it was demolished) is from about 1956. (Source: the “Brown Books” from the University Park Library, which I wrote about here — Dear University Park Library: I can no longer get this incredibly useful site to work!)

6421_preston_concrete-house_brown-bks_university-park_ca-1931

6421-preston_apartments_brown-bk_university-park_1956_former-concrete-house

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Below, a charming ad for the skating rink at Fair Park. It has been added to the charming 2014 post “Skate Date!” (“charming” if you skim over the prostitution bits). (Source: eBay)

fair-park-skating-rink_matchbook_ebay

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I’ve added this photo of the construction of the Dallas Athletic Club — taken by Charles Erwin Arnold — to the 2015 post “The Dallas Athletic Club Building, 1925-1981.” Kinda low-res and watermarked, but I don’t think I’ve seen it before, and I really like it. The intersection is Elm and St. Paul, and the view is to the south. (Source: Arnold Photographic Collection, Dallas Historical Society. Want it high-res with no watermark? Hie thee to the DHS and ask for item A.68.28.17.)

dallas-athletic-club_construction_DHS

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This Mohr Chevrolet ad from 1975 has been added to the 2021 post “Simms Super Service Station, Cedar Springs & Maple — 1930.” (Source: 1975 Dallas city directory)

mohr-chevrolet_1975-directory

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Lastly, I’ve added a few articles and images to the 2014 post “Roger Corman Does Dallas,” about a painfully groovy, super-low-budget, anti-establishment movie, a few scenes of which were filmed in downtown Dallas and on the SMU campus in 1969. The official movie title is complicated and irritatingly punctuated — let’s just call it “Gas” to make things easier. Here’s one of the things I’ve added to the original post, a 1970 ad from the SMU campus newspaper (click to see a larger image). (Source: SMU Daily Campus, Nov. 4, 1970, Student Newspapers collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University)

gassssss_movie_smu-daily-campus_nov-4-1970

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Until next time….

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

East on Elm

elm-street_gentrys_city-of-dallas-websiteShouldn’t there be cars?

by Paula Bosse

There has been some heavy-duty editing to this post!

Here’s an interesting photo I stumbled across last night on the City of Dallas website. There wasn’t any information about it, but it appears to be a view to the east, taken from the 1400 block of Elm Street (where Exchange Place — originally Scollard Court — intersects). See what it looks like today on Google Street View here.

The main landmarks are what I call the Wilson Building Jr. (the tall dark building in the distance, located on Elm near Ervay), the Praetorian Building (the tall white building at the right, at Main and Stone), and L. W. Gentry’s photography studio in the middle of the photo at the right.

Gentry’s was upstairs at 1304 Elm from about 1904 until about 1911. In 1912, Gentry moved a block down the street to 1502 Elm, at Akard, where he took over the upstairs studio of photographer J. C. Deane. (I wrote about Deane and this building here.)

There is a sign reading “Empress” at the left. That was the Empress Theatre, which was at 1409 Elm from about 1912 to 1915. Directly across the street is a 3-story building with a sign for the Spirella Corset Parlors at 1410 Elm.

Back to the left, across the street, is the hard-to-read sign for Studebaker Bros. of Texas at 1405 Elm. Directly across the street is the new Kress Building (you can see part of the distinctive “K” from the company’s logo at the top right). Kress was at 1404-8 Elm — the building was erected in 1911 and opened that same year in November.

The “new Wilson Building” was also built in 1911, and Gentry’s took over the space above T. J. Britton’s store at Elm and Akard in 1912. And all these places appeared in the 1912 directory (except for the Empress, which was open in 1912 but might not have made the listing deadline). So I’m going to guess that this photo is from 1912 or 1913.

gentry_1912-directory_1502-ELM1912 Dallas directory, Elm Street

But this photo looks older than 1912. So many horses! The only vehicle not pulled by a horse in this photo is the streetcar. Where are the cars? In 1911, Dallas was pretty car-crazy — you’d expect to see at least ONE horseless carriage in there somewhere. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but in 1911, there were about one thousand automobiles registered in Dallas County, and the city was quickly becoming a major distribution hub for car companies (“Dallas Automobile Center of the Southwest,” Dallas Morning News, Dec. 31, 1911). (Check out this photo from 1911 taken a couple of blocks away. The only animals seen are actually riding IN an automobile!) Were cars banned from Elm Street? Seems unlikely. …I’m pretty sure I’m overthinking this.

(Ironically enough, the full entry for Studebaker Bros. which appears in the 1912 directory reads: “Carriages, wagons, buggies, street sprinklers, harness.” Nary a mention of an automobile. That arrived the following year.)

It might just be that I’ve had a very stressful couple of weeks, and it was really late when I originally wrote this. But I’ve had a refreshing night’s sleep, and I’m still fixating on this car thing. (Shouldn’t there be cars on Elm Street in 1912?) So I’m just going to stop looking at this photo, assume that it was snapped when all cars in the area were just out of frame, and wrap this thing up.

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Here are a few zoomed-in details.

elm-street_gentrys_city-of-dallas-website_det1

elm-street_gentrys_city-of-dallas-website_det2

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I love these decorative lamp posts (more examples can be seen in a post I really enjoyed writing, “The Grand Elm Street Illumination — 1911”).

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Sources & Notes

Photo found on the City of Dallas website, here (banner photo).

I have edited this after seeing the reader comment below. I realized that I was basing the original location on Lemuel W. Gentry’s first studio, which was a block or two west from the one seen in the photo. (I kept saying to myself, “That building looks so much like the one the Deane studio was in.” Because… it was the exact same building!) Thanks, NotBob.

Here’s a closer shot of Gentry’s studio around 1915 — on the southeast corner of Elm and Akard, right across the street from the new Queen Theatre. (This photo originally appeared in this post.)

queen_cinema-treasures

NOW we see cars!

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

“It’s Big, It’s Fantastic!” — State Fair of Texas, 1949

sfot_1949_ebay_aWhen dinosaurs roamed Fair Park…

by Paula Bosse

Uh, hmm. Let’s see….

Dinosaur? Check.

Wearing a cowboy hat? Check.

Wearing a bandana? Check.

Wearing spurs? (!) Check.

With buck teeth? Check.

Looming over an art deco building? Check.

It must be time for the fair!

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Sources & Notes

Postcard found on eBay.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Pacific Avenue Warehouse District

pacific-warehouse-district_ebayLooking west on Pacific, from about Good Street

by Paula Bosse

Wandering around the eBay “sold” archives, I came across this unusual photo taken in a not terribly scenic part of town. After checking addresses of these businesses in the 1932 city directory, it looks like the photographer (who appears to have been seated in a car) snapped this shot on N. Pacific Avenue, a block or so west from Good Street (now Good-Latimer). Deep Ellum-adjacent. The view is southwesterly, toward downtown. The businesses are mostly warehouses. See what this view looks like today, 90 years or so later, via Google Street View, here.

I was excited to see two familiar 19th-century buildings which I’ve written about and feel a weird kinship with: the abandoned and shuttered old Union Depot (which I wrote about here) and the Union Depot Hotel (which I wrote about here) — located about where Pacific takes a slight jog to the right. It’s like seeing old friends.

Here are some rather grainy magnifications of the eBay “snapshot” (click to see larger images).

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Below: the Western States Grocery Co. was located at the southwest corner of Hawkins and Pacific. The Home Furnishings Co. was at 2301-2311 Elm Street (at Preston). Many of the buildings in this view (except for the 5-story-ish tall building straight ahead and to the right) can be seen in this 1921 Sanborn map. (Is that the pre-Pegasus Magnolia Building seen in the distance behind the 5-story building at the right? If so, that would mean that this photo was taken before 1934.)

pacific-toward-downtown_ebay_det-1

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The building seen below in the foreground at the left is the old Union Depot. I’ve seen so many photos of this building — but it looks TINY here! Just across the street (railroad tracks) from it (in the building seen immediately below the “Radios” sign) is the old Union Depot Hotel. The H&TC railroad used to run between them — Central Avenue later (basically) became Central Expressway. I was really excited to see these two buildings.

The taller building seen in the background, behind the Hart Furniture sign, can be seen in this 1921 Sanborn map — the 5-story building at the southwest corner of Pacific and Preston was home to the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills (another story was added around 1935).

pacific-toward-downtown_ebay_depot-and-hotel

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The Combs Transfer & Storage Co., the Packer Transfer & Storage Co., and the Baldwin Piano Ware Room were all at 2507-2509 Pacific. It looks like the two buildings seen in this detail (the short one and the taller one) have somehow miraculously survived the insane redevelopment of everything on all sides of it (I’ve haven’t been to Deep Ellum in a few months, but these two buildings seem to be the ones which you can see in the most recent Google Street View). Also, looming like a ghostly whisper in the background (above “Combs”) is the Medical Arts Building.

pacific-toward-downtown_ebay_medical-arts-bldg

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I wonder why someone decided to take this photo? I’m glad they did, because it’s not a view I’ve ever seen. I love finding photographs taken in places that most people wouldn’t think were interesting enough to document for posterity. Like this one. Thanks, anonymous photographer!

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I just picked the closest historical map I had easy access to — the 1952 Mapsco. My guess is that the photograph is from the 1930s. The star is about where the photo was taken — just west of what is now Good-Latimer, just before Pacific becomes Gaston — with a view to the west.

pacific-toward-downtown_mapsco_19521952 Mapsco (det.)

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Sources & Notes

Photo found on eBay — it looks like the item sold a couple of weeks ago, in Sept. 2022.

pacific-warehouse-district_ebay_sm

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Safari Redux

safari_squire-haskins_1961_UTA_1Dallas? Yes!

by Paula Bosse

Back in 2014 — when Flashback Dallas was still in its blogging infancy — I wrote about the Safari Steak House in North Dallas in the post “Back When Preston Royal Was ‘Exotic’ and Had Its Very Own Elephant.” There were a few errors in that post which I corrected today, thanks to a couple of commenters on the original post who pointed out that what I thought showed the Safari restaurant at Preston & Royal showed, instead, the Houston location. Kind of embarrassing!

What better time than this to say that I ABSOLUTELY WELCOME CORRECTIONS!! I’d like this blog to be as unpedantically accurate as possible, so, please, if you see I’ve smugly written something which is blatantly incorrect, please let me know! I’ll be happy you let me know.

I invite you to check out that original post, now updated with a couple of photos of the actual Dallas Safari Steak House, including the one above, taken by the estimable Squire Haskins in 1961.

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Sources & Notes

Photo “Safari Steak House, Dallas, Texas” by Squire Haskins, 1961, from the Squire Haskins Photography Inc. Collection, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries, Special Collections — more info on this photo can be found here. (Thank you for the links, Tom Bowen!)

The Safari space is now occupied by Royal China, which I love from the days I worked across the street at Borders.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

L. O. Daniel’s Country Home, “Cedar Crest”

daniel-l-o_cedar-crest_flickr_coltera
Still standing on West Jefferson Blvd. in Oak Cliff

by Paula Bosse

While looking for something on W. Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel (former governor and U.S. senator), I came across the image above, which I had mistakenly labeled “O’Daniel” rather than “Daniel.” It had nothing at all to do with W. Lee O’Daniel but, instead, showed a house belonging to L. O. Daniel. Who was L. O. Daniel? I’d never heard of him.

Lark Owen Daniel Sr. (1866-1927) was a wealthy businessman who made big money from… hats! He sold a lot of hats through his wholesale millinery company, and he was also involved in some spectacular real estate dealings (a newspaper article in 1907 mentioned he had just sold a couple of lots on Elm Street for $30,000 — if you believe online inflation calculators, that would be the equivalent of almost a million dollars in today’s money!). As a proven earner of big bucks, he was also the first president of the Dallas Chamber of Commerce.

Even before that huge real estate sale, Daniel was swimming in hat-cash. In 1901 he bought 27 acres near the Fort Worth Interurban rail line and built a 5,000-square-foot, 3-story, 15-room Victorian mansion. He named the house “Cedar Crest.” I don’t know if it was technically in Oak Cliff at that point, but it was definitely outside the Dallas city limits. This is the way Daniel’s address appeared in the 1910 city directory:

daniel-l-o_directory_19101910 Dallas directory

And here’s a photo of an interurban trundling along, uncomfortably close to the house:

cedar-crest_interurban_oak-cliff-advocate

The luxurious splendor of the somewhat isolated Cedar Crest apparently emitted a high-pitched siren-call which was frequently heard by area bandits: it was burgled quite a few times (at least 3 times in one 12-month period). After one incident in which a burglar wandered through the house in the dead of night and woke Mrs. Daniel as he stood over her as she lay in bed, Oak Cliff police said that they found no trace of the trespasser but saw where he had hitched his horse and get-away buggy, out back in the orchard. In another incident a few months later, Mrs. Daniel — who had been alerted by an employee that the family car was about to be stolen from the “automobile house” — ran out to the garage armed with a revolver and fired three shots at the thieves, scaring them away (I don’t think she was attempting to fire warning shots — I think she fired AT them). This may seem extreme, but the newspaper noted that the value of the car (in 1915) was an eye-watering $4,000 (more than $110,000 in today’s money!). I don’t know where Mr. Daniel was during all this, but Mrs. Daniel was not about to let that car go anywhere!

One summer, the Daniels rented out Cedar Crest while they vacationed elsewhere. The ad in the paper specified that only “responsible parties without small children” were welcome. I hate to keep harping on about the money, but a two-month stay at L. O.’s “beautiful country home” would set some responsible childless person/s back a cool $300 (almost $9,000 in today’s money). (Who would pay such an exorbitant amount of money to stay in an un-airconditioned house in North Texas during the height of the summer?)

daniel_house-for-rent_summer-1912
Summer 1912

L. O. Daniel died in Feb. 1927. His business empire was closed down, and the large Cedar Crest swath of land he owned was put up for sale in 1929.

daniel_cedar-crest_april-1929April 1929

I’m not sure what happened with that specific transaction, but his son, L. O. Daniel Jr., ended up breaking that land up into parcels and selling residential lots as part of the “L. O. Daniel Jr. Addition,” beginning in about 1940.

daniel-addition_june-1940_mapJune 1940

daniel-addition_nov-1940November 1940

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This beautiful house is — somehow — still standing. It is located at 2223 West Jefferson in Oak Cliff, facing Sunset High School (see it on Google Street View here). Over the years the mansion fell into disrepair, but in the early ’80s the house was restored by two men — Martin Rubin and Earl Remmel — and it received historical landmark status in 1984. Cedar Crest was purchased a few years ago and has gone through additional restoration/renovation — it currently serves as the impressive law offices for the firm of Durham, Pittard & Spalding.

There are lots of photos online. View some on the Zillow site — which show what it looked like before it was recently updated — here. See some really beautiful photos on CedarCrestOakCliff.com, here. I particularly love this one:

cedar-crest_entry_cedar-crest-oak-cliff-dot-com

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It shouldn’t have been so hard to find a photo of L. O. — but this is about all I could find. Followed by a hats-hats-hats! ad.

daniel_l-o_photo

daniel_oct-1915_adOct. 1915

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Sources & Notes

Postcard at top (circa 1909) found a few years ago on the Flickr stream of Coltera (not sure if he’s still posting there — if not, that’s a shame, because he had amazing things!).

Photo of the interurban from the 2017 Oak Cliff Advocate article “Law Firm Renovates Historic Mansion on Jefferson” by Rachel Stone (click the link at the bottom of the article to read a piece published in Texas Lawyer which includes information on specific restoration/renovation work done on the house).

There are so many great homes in the L. O. Daniel area — look at a whole bunch on the L. O. Daniel Neighborhood Association website here.

Also recommended is the 2019 Candy’s Dirt article “What’s in a Name For L. O. Daniel?” by Deb R. Brimer.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Old Lake Highlands

white-rock-lake_old-lake-highlands_1956_don-jones1956, Room to spread out…

by Paula Bosse

The photo above — taken in 1956 — shows an aerial view of Old Lake Highlands, looking southwesterly toward White Rock Lake. The street in the foreground is Kirkwood Drive.

But for even older Old Lake Highlands, we need to cast our minds back to 1927, when W. H. Brouse began to advertise for one of his many East Dallas developments. One of the ads from the Lake Highlands Co. (W. McCarty Moore, President and H. W. Brouse, Director of Sales) read:

IN THE MAKING — LAKE HIGHLANDS, “THE INCOMPARABLE”

Another High-Class Residence  Section For Dallas on White Rock Lake

Believing in Dallas — believing in the continued rapid absorption of territory to the north and east for homes — and especially that beautiful terrain surrounding White Rock Lake, Lake Highlands was conceived and made possible by the owning company.

The tract — some 117 acres — is especially advantageously located in that it is right on the lake itself — just a short drive from the dam, and is bounded by water on three sides. A peninsular piece of ground, in fact.

The ad also noted that “lots will be large — prices low”: $1,100 and $1,200 (about $18,000-$19,500 in today’s money).

lake-highlands-co_dmn_100927_det1927

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And, in a Dallas Morning News real estate advertorial were these additional deets:

Lake Highlands is situated just beyond Dixon’s Branch, on the east shore of the lake, and is accessible directly from the downtown section by Swiss and Gaston avenues and the old Garland road, leading into the lake road. This, in turn, gives access to the 100-foot boulevard, which will circle the whole development, and from which lead streets seventy feet in width, reaching every lot in the development. Roadways and streets will be surfaced with white gravel, while curbs and sidewalks will be installed in advance of building development, as will all utilities, lights, water, gas and sewer facilities….

Construction will be restricted to homes to cost $5,500 to $7,500 minimums [$90,000-$122,000 today], depending on the location of the lots on which they are built. Materials will be limited to brick, hollow tile and stucco, so as automatically to eliminate the fire hazard and also to assure permanence.

I’m sure life on the lake in 1927 was worth every penny.

kirkwood_white-rock-lake_googleGoogle Maps

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Sources & Notes

I came across the photo at the top of this post several years ago in a photo blog hosted by The Dallas Morning News, but the blog doesn’t seem to exist any longer. The caption noted that the photo had been shared by Lynn Jones who had come across it when going through a collection of color slides inherited by her husband when Don Jones died in 2010.

Quotes from the real estate advertorial, “Plan Homes at White Rock” (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 9, 1927).

white-rock-lake_old-lake-highlands_1956_don-jones_sm

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Happy World Mosquito Day!

ad-acme-screen-co_terrill-yrbk_1924“Ding it!” (1924 ad)

by Paula Bosse

I have discovered that today — August 20 — is World Mosquito Day. Personally, I would save any mosquito-related celebrating until the entire species has been eradicated (…or at least eradicated from anywhere near ME), but, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, this day “marks the anniversary of the discovery that mosquitoes transmit the parasite that causes malaria. On this day in 1897, Sir Ronald Ross discovered the malaria parasite in the stomach tissue of an Anopheles mosquito. His work later confirmed that mosquitoes are the vector which carries this devastating parasite from human to human.”

So, thanks for that, Sir Ronald Ross.

In 2017 I wrote about Dallas’ early battles with mosquitoes — and I really enjoyed discovering how people dealt with them before window screens. Read that post here: “The Mosquito Bar.”

mosquito-net-pith-helmet-pipe_sm

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

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