Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Category: Vault

From the Vault: Lunch-Ladies of Yesteryear

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by Paula Bosse

Ah, school lunches. I’m pretty sure the scene above of Dallas school cafeteria workers shelling fresh peas was one not seen in my lifetime. I’m definitely a product of the canned-and-frozen-food era. Check out the post “School Lunches of Yesteryear” for a list of eyebrow-raising delectables from a typical menu offered to Dallas students in the 1920s and ’30s.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: W. W. Orr, Buggy Man of the 1870s and ’80s

ad-orr-carriages_directory_1878

by Paula Bosse

I love this ad from 1878, showing W. W. Orr’s carriage shop at Main and Martin (with an open-air second-floor showroom!). Read about Mr. Orr in the Flashback Dallas post from 2014, “W. W. Orr: Buggies, Phaetons, Carriages — ‘Everything On Wheels!'”

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Ebby Halliday

ebby_1956_charm_via-candys-dirtphoto: Ebby Halliday Realtors

by Paula Bosse

This fantastic photograph of a 40-something-year-old Ebby Halliday appeared in Charm magazine (“The magazine for women who work”) and shows Ebby in high ’50s fashion, surveying the city that made her very, very wealthy.

I wrote about Ebby Halliday in 2015 the day after her death at the age of 104. I’ve gone back and expanded that post, adding more about the life of one of Dallas’ most successful real estate titans — the post, “Ebby Halliday: 1911-2015” — is here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #10

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by Paula Bosse

Time again to add bits and pieces of stuff I’ve come across recently to old posts.

The first addition is the photo above, showing a once-familiar site upon approaching Six Flags Over Texas. This has been added to the inexplicably popular “The Hyperbolic Paraboloids of the Prairie.” (Source: Texas Highways magazine Facebook page — 1961 photo by Willis Albarado)

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Below, a photo of the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink eye-popping “ballyhoo” adorning the entrance to the Capitol Theater for the 1936 showing of Marihuana, now a cult classic. (“Weed with roots in hell. Can they take it just once and then quit? Women cry for it, men will slay for it.”) (Movie promotion isn’t what it used to be.) This fantastic photo has been added to one of my favorite posts “‘Delusions of Affability’ — Marijuana in 1930s Dallas.” (Source: George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University) (All images are larger when clicked.)

marihuana_capitol_1936_cook-collection_degolyer-library_SMU

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This ca. 1875-1880 photo of the R. F. Eisenlohr store and “German pharmacy” (southwest corner of Main and Field) has been added to “The Eisenlohr Family and Dallas’ First Christmas Tree — 1874.” (Source: DeGolyer Library, SMU)

eisenlohr-store_degolyer-lib_SMU

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Nothing all that exciting, perhaps, about this matchbook art, but it’s atmospheric. It’s been added to “Gene’s Music Bar, The Lasso Bar, and the Zoo Bar.” (Source: eBay)

zoo-bar_matchbook_ebay_2     zoo-bar_matchbook_ebay_1

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This article on Dallas’ historic cemeteries near where the current City Hall was built has been added to “The Historic Masonic, Odd Fellows, and City Cemeteries.” (Source: Historic Dallas magazine, July, 1985, via UNT’s Portal to Texas History)

pioneer-cemeteries_historic-dallas_july-1985_portal

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My family’s neighborhood “special occasion” restaurant was Kirby’s steakhouse on Lower Greenville. I recently came across a 1987 Channel 5 news report on the closing of the long-lived restaurant (it had started out as a Pig Stand in the 1920s). I’ve added this screenshot and the link to the news report (which can be watched here) to the post “My Birthdays at Kirby’s: Filet Mignon for Everyone!” (Source: KXAS-NBC 5 News Collection, UNT Libraries, via the Portal to Texas History)

kirbys_ch-5_closing_screencap_portal

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The Associated Press photo below — which shows a police officer posing with confiscated contraband seized in raids of the homes of the city’s “enemy aliens” (in this case Germans and Italians) — has been added to the post “‘Enemy Aliens’ and the WWII Internment Camp at Seagoville,” along with a United Press article from Feb., 1942.

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Lubbock Avalanche, Feb. 26, 1942 (click to read)

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Three views of the DP&L power plant because, why not?, has been added to “DP&L’s Twin Smokestacks.”

dallas-power-and-light_degolyer-lib_SMUvia DeGolyer Library, SMU

dpl-plant_towers_squire-haskins_UTAvia Squire Haskins Collection, University of Texas at Arlington

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source unknown

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I keep adding photos of the old East Dallas railroad depot to the post “The Old Union Depot in East Dallas: 1897-1935” — it may be getting a bit much. I’m adding three more anyway.

east-dallas-union-depot_degolyer-lib_SMU
via DeGolyer Library, SMU

union-depot_east-dallas_1933_degolyer-lib_SMU
via DeGolyer Library, SMU

union-depot_your-dallas-of-tomorrow_1943_portal“Your Dallas of Tomorrow” (1943), Portal to Texas History

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I’ve been contacted by several people who live in the converted factory now known as “2220 Canton” about the (FANTASTIC!) main photo I used in the post “Canton Street: Poultry, Pecans, and Future Luxury Lofts.” Only because I had to figure out where that photo had been taken do I now know about Olive & Myers, the furniture manufacturers who once occupied a sprawling hub of buildings in the Farmers Market area. I’m adding a few images to that post for you, enthusiastic 2220 people.

olive-and-myers_come-to-dallas_degolyer_SMU_ca1905
ca. 1905, DeGolyer Library, SMU (link lost!)

olive-myers_hist-of-an-opportunity_degolyer-lib_SMU_ca-1910via DeGolyer Library, SMU

olive-myers_legacies_spring-2013Legacies, Spring 2013, via Portal to Texas History

olive-myers_centennial-ad_june-1936

olive-myers_centennial-ad_june-1936_det
Centennial ad, June, 1936, above (with very large detail below)

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: #1 in Junk

ad-hengy-junk_city-directory_1890

by Paula Bosse

Who was the top man in junk in turn-of-the-century Dallas? It was F. J. Hengy, who, when not practicing his junk business, seems to have spent all of his free time in court suing and being sued. Read about this interesting early Dallasite in the Flashback Dallas post from 2015, “F. J. Hengy: Junk Merchant, Litigant.”

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Dali Does Dallas — 1952

dali_union-station_feb-1952_dpl
“A Dali-an door!”

by Paula Bosse

Salvador Dali visited Dallas in February, 1952 on a lecture tour. Not only was he delighted to find this oddly slanted doorway at Union Station, he also said that while in Texas he had been astonished to find himself dreaming in vivid technicolor. Read the original Flashback Dallas post “Salvador Dali Brings ‘Nuclear Mysticism’ to Dallas — 1952,” here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: When Funeral Homes Become McKinney Avenue Hotspots

ad-funeral-home_mckinney-routh_directory-1929-detThe “slumber chamber” is occupied…

by Paula Bosse

As much as I dislike what the unfortunate over-development of “Uptown” has done to the quirky, funky style of the McKinney Avenue of my childhood, it’s always a shock to realize that, somehow, a few surprisingly old buildings still stand. One of them is this once-fabulous building at McKinney and Routh — it was built in 1927 as a funeral home but has been the site of a succession of restaurants for the past couple of decades. Who knew? Read about it in my post from 2015, “Not Dead Yet at McKinney & Routh,” here.

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: How Dallas Used To Get Election Returns

election-returns_1928_frank-rogers_dpl
Tight race.…

by Paula Bosse

It’s election time again. A post I wrote a couple of years ago on how people followed an evening’s election returns in the years before radio was a lot of fun to research. I bet you’ll learn some things you never even considered in the Flashback Dallas post from 2016, “How Dallas Used to Get Election Returns,” here.

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 is election day across the country. Please VOTE!

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #9

wynnewood-village_postcard_birdseye Welcome to Wynnewood… 

by Paula Bosse

Time for another installment of me-adding-new-stuff-to-old-stuff.

First up: this cool postcard of Wynnewood Village has been added to the post “Wynnewood.”  (Source: the endless, depthless “internet”)

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Below, this circa-1905 photo of the ever-popular, still-standing-in-the-West-End Brown Cracker Co. Building has been added to the liltingly-titled “Brown Cracker Co. Cracker Wrappers.” (Source: a promotional brochure titled “Come To Dallas,” DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University, here)

brown-cracker_come-to-dallas_degolyer_SMU_ca1905

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This proposed design for the Texas Centennial’s Hall of Negro Life is pretty cool and is interesting to compare to the building eventually constructed. It’s been added to “Juneteenth at the Texas Centennial — 1936.” (Source: An Historical and Pictorial Souvenir of the Negro In Texas History, written by J. Mason Brewer, 1935)

hall-of-negro-life_proposed_the-negro-in-texas-history_1935

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Another lovely postcard image of the formerly lovely South Ervay Street has been added to “Beautiful South Ervay Street — ca. 1910.” (Source: the aforementioned “internet”)

ervay_postcard_clogenson_postmark-1908

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This 1887 photo of the Dallas Morning News’ special train which made morning delivery possible to far-flung-ish locales has been added to one of my personal favorite posts, “The Dallas News Special: Fast Train to Denison — 1887.” (Source: the George A. McAfee photographs collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)

dallas-news-special_train-to-denison_1887_mcafee_degolyer_SMU

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I love graphics like this simple line drawing of the 1936 Fair Park building which once housed the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts (now the Dallas Museum of Art). It adorned letterhead and DMFA publications. and has been added to the post “Summers and Lagoons — 1940s.” 

dmfa_logo_1944

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This photo of the Adolphus Hotel’s barbershop has been added to the post “The Adolphus Hotel’s ‘Coffee Room’ — 1919.” I think that the barbershop and the “coffee room” might have occupied the same space — at different times. (Source: the Adolphus Archives; found in Historic Dallas Hotels by Sam Childers)

adolphus-barber-shop_childers_adolphus-archives

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I just wrote about the 1928 Southwestern Bell Telephone Building — and I *just* ran across a photo of the original 1890s SWB building, which stood next to the newer building for many years. This circa-1905 photo has been added to “The New Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. Building — 1928.” (Source: “Come To Dallas,” DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)


southwestern-bell-bldg_come-to-dallas_degolyer_SMU_ca1905

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This 1889 ad for the electrical business run by a remarkably fascinating man named D. M. Clower has been added to an unusual post I wrote about how I research things: “Tracking Down a Photo Location & Discovering a City Pioneer: D. M. Clower, The Man Who Brought the Telephone to Dallas.” (Source: 1889 city directory)


clower_electrician_1889-directory

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And a whole bunch of picture postcards (…of a highway…) have been added to “The DFW Turnpike, Unsullied by Traffic, Billboards, or Urban Sprawl — 1957.” (Source: the internet’s nooks and crannies)

dfw_turnpike

dfw-turnpike_postcard

dfw-turnpike_flickr_coltera

dfw-turnpike_postcard_skyline

dallas-fw-turnpike_postcard

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Early United Flights Out of Love Field

aeiral_united-air-lines_fairchild_ebay_rppc

by Paula Bosse

See a large image of this great aerial view of downtown and appreciate how much flight times have been pared down over the past 85 years or so in the 2015 Flashback Dallas post “Fly United to Chicago in Only Eight Hours!,” here.

 

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

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