Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Category: Vault

Photo Additions To Past Posts — #18

kodachrome_downtown_ebayBig D Kodachrome

by Paula Bosse

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these, so why not now? These are things I’ve collected over the past months which I am now adding to old posts in order to keep everything together.

The first is the color photo above, showing the super-fab Walgreens at the corner of Commerce and Akard (see my favorite photo of it in this post), with the view looking north on Akard. I’ve added it to the 2021 post “Downtown Dallas in Color — 1940s & 1950s.” (Source: eBay)

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I’ve added some text and a couple of photos about Ernest Oates, the Englishman who brought soccer to Dallas, to the 2014 post “The Dallas Athletics, Dallas’ First Soccer Team — 1908.” (Source, 1922 Dallas city directory)

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I’ve added this 1961 ad to the perhaps-too-exhaustingly-exhaustive post from 2018, “Sam Ventura’s Italian Village, Oak Lawn.” (Source: Diane Wisdom Papers, Archives of Women of the Southwest, DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)

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I try to avoid posting photos with watermarks, but I love this, so I’ve added it to one of my favorite posts, “Ghost Rails of the Belmont Streetcar Line” from 2018. It shows a Belmont car in front of the Palace Theatre at Elm and Ervay. The marquee shows that “New Moon” — starring Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy — is playing. “New Moon” opened at the Palace on July 4, 1940 and ran for a week. (Source: eBay)

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Do people still say “funeral parlor”? This ad from 1937 for the Weever Funeral Home has been added to the 2015 post “Not Dead Yet at McKinney & Routh.” The building at 2533 McKinney was built in 1927 and was a strikingly beautiful (and pricey) funeral home — it’s still standing and has been occupied in recent years by a string of Uptown restaurants. This ad proudly notes that “Weever advertises his prices” — he is completely transparent about the fact that the price of a silver-plated casket is gonna set you back $2,250 (the equivalent in today’s money of $45,000). Can’t say you weren’t warned. (Source: 1937 Dallas city directory)

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These two photos have to do with a concrete house built in University Park around 1914 (I was kind of obsessed with it a few years ago). They have been added to the 2018 post “Dallas in ‘The Western Architect,’ 1914: Park Cities Residences” (this is one in a ridiculously crammed-full-of-information 7-part series I wrote about buildings featured in an architectural journal — I  probably learned more about early-20th-century buildings in Dallas from researching and writing those posts than from anything else I’ve done). The first photo (the concrete house, looking a lot less dynamic than when it was brand new) was taken around 1931; the second photo (the Presley Apartments, which replaced the concrete house when it was demolished) is from about 1956. (Source: the “Brown Books” from the University Park Library, which I wrote about here — Dear University Park Library: I can no longer get this incredibly useful site to work!)

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Below, a charming ad for the skating rink at Fair Park. It has been added to the charming 2014 post “Skate Date!” (“charming” if you skim over the prostitution bits). (Source: eBay)

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I’ve added this photo of the construction of the Dallas Athletic Club — taken by Charles Erwin Arnold — to the 2015 post “The Dallas Athletic Club Building, 1925-1981.” Kinda low-res and watermarked, but I don’t think I’ve seen it before, and I really like it. The intersection is Elm and St. Paul, and the view is to the south. (Source: Arnold Photographic Collection, Dallas Historical Society. Want it high-res with no watermark? Hie thee to the DHS and ask for item A.68.28.17.)

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This Mohr Chevrolet ad from 1975 has been added to the 2021 post “Simms Super Service Station, Cedar Springs & Maple — 1930.” (Source: 1975 Dallas city directory)

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Lastly, I’ve added a few articles and images to the 2014 post “Roger Corman Does Dallas,” about a painfully groovy, super-low-budget, anti-establishment movie, a few scenes of which were filmed in downtown Dallas and on the SMU campus in 1969. The official movie title is complicated and irritatingly punctuated — let’s just call it “Gas” to make things easier. Here’s one of the things I’ve added to the original post, a 1970 ad from the SMU campus newspaper (click to see a larger image). (Source: SMU Daily Campus, Nov. 4, 1970, Student Newspapers collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University)

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Until next time….

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Happy World Mosquito Day!

ad-acme-screen-co_terrill-yrbk_1924“Ding it!” (1924 ad)

by Paula Bosse

I have discovered that today — August 20 — is World Mosquito Day. Personally, I would save any mosquito-related celebrating until the entire species has been eradicated (…or at least eradicated from anywhere near ME), but, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, this day “marks the anniversary of the discovery that mosquitoes transmit the parasite that causes malaria. On this day in 1897, Sir Ronald Ross discovered the malaria parasite in the stomach tissue of an Anopheles mosquito. His work later confirmed that mosquitoes are the vector which carries this devastating parasite from human to human.”

So, thanks for that, Sir Ronald Ross.

In 2017 I wrote about Dallas’ early battles with mosquitoes — and I really enjoyed discovering how people dealt with them before window screens. Read that post here: “The Mosquito Bar.”

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Summer Rerun: Street Life Around Neiman’s — ca. 1920

6-ervayNewsboy racing down Ervay…

by Paula Bosse

The image above is a small detail from a photo of the Neiman-Marcus building at Main and Ervay — the streets and sidewalks around the store are crammed with people and traffic. This is one of my all-time personal favorite posts, originally posted all the way back in the first months of Flashback Dallas, in May 2014. Check out other wonderful “hidden” glimpses (as well as the equally wonderful original photograph from SMU’s DeGolyer Library) in the post “‘There Are Eight Million Stories in the Naked City…” — ca. 1920.”

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Summer Rerun: Once-Beautiful South Ervay Street

ervay_postcard_clogenson_postmark-1908

by Paula Bosse

No new post this week, I’m afraid. But here’s a nice old one, plucked from the archives: “Beautiful South Ervay Street — ca. 1910.”

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Summer Rerun: ICE! — 1890s

dallas-ice-factory_dallas-observer_ebayIce…

by Paula Bosse

It wasn’t quite as hot today as it was when I wrote “Dallas Ice Factory” in 2018. But it was close. Stay cool, y’all. Close the blinds, draw the curtains. Wish for the quick arrival of September October November.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

Summer Rerun: “Melons On Ice”

wiley-grocery_1890s_haskins-coll_utaIce-cold watermelon beckons….

by Paula Bosse

It’s hot. An ice-cold slice of watermelon sounds great. The above photo is one of my all-time favorites, from the 2016 Flashback Dallas post “‘Melons On Ice’ — 1890s.” Enjoy the flashback Flashback!

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Sources & Notes

This photo is from the Squire Haskins Photography, Inc. Collection, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries, here.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Dallas Movie Theaters

theater-row_night_telenewsThe bright lights of Elm Street…

by Paula Bosse

In honor of tonight’s Oscars, I give you a whole bunch of posts about — and images of — old Dallas movie theaters in one handy link, here. Just keep scrolling!

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: If a Bomb Hits Dallas…

passport-to-survival_nov-1958_art

by Paula Bosse

This post from 2018 has, depressingly, been gaining traction over the past few days, so why not post it again, if only as a PSA? “‘Dallas Is a Major Target Area!’ Know Where Your Nearest Fallout Shelter Is.”

And, you know, while we’re at it, another sadly topical post from 2016: “A-Bomb in Akard Street! — 1950,” complete with an eerie illustration of a smoldering downtown Dallas.

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Copyright © 2022 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #17

n-m_french-fortnight_stanley-marcus-papers_degolyer-lib_SMU_color_1957Rue de Ervay

by Paula Bosse

It’s time again to insert recently-found stuff into old posts.

The first one, above, is great: it shows the facade which covered the exterior of Neiman-Marcus during the French Fortnight of 1957 — the very first Neiman’s “Fortnight” celebration. I had used a black-and-white version of this photo in the post “Neiman-Marcus Brings France to Big D — 1957,” but I’ve replaced it with this wonderful original color version. (Source: Stanley Marcus Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University — more info on this photo can be found here)

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The next image comes from a postcard showing a path and a footbridge in Sullivan Park — it has been added to “City Park Construction Work — 1941.” The reason it’s been added there is because it’s the only post which mentions “Sullivan Park,” the blink-and-it-and-you’ll-miss-it period when City Park changed its name (it changed back to “City Park” in 1941 after only about 5 years)  — the main photo of that post shows construction work in (let’s call it) Sullivan Park. I’m pretty sure this is the bridge I wrote about in the post “Iola Bridge.” (Source: eBay)

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And since we’re in the neighborhood — in fact right next door — here are a couple of images I’ve come across showing what most of us probably knew as the Ambassador Hotel (RIP). Below are postcards from its second incarnation as the Park Hotel, and a “now-you-see-it-now-you-don’t” view of S. Ervay, before and after the 2019 fire that destroyed the 115-year-old building. They’ve been added to the post “The Majestic Hotel/The Park Hotel/The Ambassador Hotel: R.I.P. — 1904-2019.” (Sources: the postcards are from eBay, and the 2018 and 2021 images are from Google Street View)

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And speaking of hotels, here’s a grainy Dallas Morning News photo of the Stoneleigh under construction in 1923 with a caption offering some tidbits about the swanky new “eleven-story affair” — they’ve been added to “The Stoneleigh Court Apartment Hotel — 1923/1924.” (Source: Dallas Morning News, April 22, 1923)

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I really enjoyed writing about the Brown Cracker Co. which occupied an imposing building in the West End. I’ve added the picture below to the post “Brown Cracker Co. Cracker Wrappers.” (Source: eBay)

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Here’s a very thin image of a railroad spike commemorating the opening of the new Santa Fe passenger line to Chicago in 1955 — it has been squeezed almost imperceptibly into the already-jam-packed post “White Rock Station. (Source: a nice man in Oklahoma named Joe)

white-rock-station_santa-fe_spike_ardmore-OK-antique-store_2020

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I’ve added the two postcards below to the post “Beautiful Lake Cliff — ca. 1906” — the first one replaced an inferior example I had used previously, and the other was a new addition. (Source: eBay)

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This 1914 photo of the Wells Fargo office on Main Street has been added to “Start Your Brilliant Career at Dallas Telegraph College — c. 1900.” (Source: Dallas Public Library, Van Orden Western Union Telegraph collection, DPL Dallas History and Archives Division, Call Number PA2007-2/2)

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And, lastly, really wishing I had some barbecue, a matchbook from Red Bryan’s which has been added to “Red Bryan’s Smokehouse — BBQ, Oak Cliff-Style.” (Source: eBay)

red-bryans-bbq_matchbook_ebay

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Dallas, Center of the Universe — 1920s

ad-dallas-chamber-of-commerce_tx-almanac_1929-det“I’m ready for my closeup, Mr. DeMille…”

by Paula Bosse

If you’ve noticed I’ve been posting very, very little over the past few weeks, it’s because I’ve been dealing with medical issues of a family member, and it’s pretty much taken over my life at this point. I hope to get back to regular posting soon. 

Here is a Dallas Chamber of Commerce ad from 1929 which pretty much tells you all you need to know about how the city of Dallas sees itself in the grand scheme of things. See another very booster-y ad from the same period in the Flashback Dallas post from 2015, “‘A City Built On the Solid Rock of Service’ — 1927.”

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

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