Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Category: Vault

From the Vault: Dali Does Dallas — 1952

dali_union-station_feb-1952_dpl
“A Dali-an door!”

by Paula Bosse

Salvador Dali visited Dallas in February, 1952 on a lecture tour. Not only was he delighted to find this oddly slanted doorway at Union Station, he also said that while in Texas he had been astonished to find himself dreaming in vivid technicolor. Read the original Flashback Dallas post “Salvador Dali Brings ‘Nuclear Mysticism’ to Dallas — 1952,” here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: When Funeral Homes Become McKinney Avenue Hotspots

ad-funeral-home_mckinney-routh_directory-1929-detThe “slumber chamber” is occupied…

by Paula Bosse

As much as I dislike what the unfortunate over-development of “Uptown” has done to the quirky, funky style of the McKinney Avenue of my childhood, it’s always a shock to realize that, somehow, a few surprisingly old buildings still stand. One of them is this once-fabulous building at McKinney and Routh — it was built in 1927 as a funeral home but has been the site of a succession of restaurants for the past couple of decades. Who knew? Read about it in my post from 2015, “Not Dead Yet at McKinney & Routh,” here.

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: How Dallas Used To Get Election Returns

election-returns_1928_frank-rogers_dpl
Tight race.…

by Paula Bosse

It’s election time again. A post I wrote a couple of years ago on how people followed an evening’s election returns in the years before radio was a lot of fun to research. I bet you’ll learn some things you never even considered in the Flashback Dallas post from 2016, “How Dallas Used to Get Election Returns,” here.

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 is election day across the country. Please VOTE!

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #9

wynnewood-village_postcard_birdseye Welcome to Wynnewood… 

by Paula Bosse

Time for another installment of me-adding-new-stuff-to-old-stuff.

First up: this cool postcard of Wynnewood Village has been added to the post “Wynnewood.”  (Source: the endless, depthless “internet”)

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Below, this circa-1905 photo of the ever-popular, still-standing-in-the-West-End Brown Cracker Co. Building has been added to the liltingly-titled “Brown Cracker Co. Cracker Wrappers.” (Source: a promotional brochure titled “Come To Dallas,” DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University, here)

brown-cracker_come-to-dallas_degolyer_SMU_ca1905

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This proposed design for the Texas Centennial’s Hall of Negro Life is pretty cool and is interesting to compare to the building eventually constructed. It’s been added to “Juneteenth at the Texas Centennial — 1936.” (Source: An Historical and Pictorial Souvenir of the Negro In Texas History, written by J. Mason Brewer, 1935)

hall-of-negro-life_proposed_the-negro-in-texas-history_1935

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Another lovely postcard image of the formerly lovely South Ervay Street has been added to “Beautiful South Ervay Street — ca. 1910.” (Source: the aforementioned “internet”)

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This 1887 photo of the Dallas Morning News’ special train which made morning delivery possible to far-flung-ish locales has been added to one of my personal favorite posts, “The Dallas News Special: Fast Train to Denison — 1887.” (Source: the George A. McAfee photographs collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)

dallas-news-special_train-to-denison_1887_mcafee_degolyer_SMU

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I love graphics like this simple line drawing of the 1936 Fair Park building which once housed the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts (now the Dallas Museum of Art). It adorned letterhead and DMFA publications. and has been added to the post “Summers and Lagoons — 1940s.” 

dmfa_logo_1944

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This photo of the Adolphus Hotel’s barbershop has been added to the post “The Adolphus Hotel’s ‘Coffee Room’ — 1919.” I think that the barbershop and the “coffee room” might have occupied the same space — at different times. (Source: the Adolphus Archives; found in Historic Dallas Hotels by Sam Childers)

adolphus-barber-shop_childers_adolphus-archives

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I just wrote about the 1928 Southwestern Bell Telephone Building — and I *just* ran across a photo of the original 1890s SWB building, which stood next to the newer building for many years. This circa-1905 photo has been added to “The New Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. Building — 1928.” (Source: “Come To Dallas,” DeGolyer Library, SMU, here)


southwestern-bell-bldg_come-to-dallas_degolyer_SMU_ca1905

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This 1889 ad for the electrical business run by a remarkably fascinating man named D. M. Clower has been added to an unusual post I wrote about how I research things: “Tracking Down a Photo Location & Discovering a City Pioneer: D. M. Clower, The Man Who Brought the Telephone to Dallas.” (Source: 1889 city directory)


clower_electrician_1889-directory

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And a whole bunch of picture postcards (…of a highway…) have been added to “The DFW Turnpike, Unsullied by Traffic, Billboards, or Urban Sprawl — 1957.” (Source: the internet’s nooks and crannies)

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dfw-turnpike_postcard

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dfw-turnpike_postcard_skyline

dallas-fw-turnpike_postcard

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Early United Flights Out of Love Field

aeiral_united-air-lines_fairchild_ebay_rppc

by Paula Bosse

See a large image of this great aerial view of downtown and appreciate how much flight times have been pared down over the past 85 years or so in the 2015 Flashback Dallas post “Fly United to Chicago in Only Eight Hours!,” here.

 

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: W. C. Connor’s (Still-Standing) Home in Highland Park

connor-home_cook-colln_degolyerW. C. Connor house, Highland Park (source: DeGolyer Library, SMU)

by Paula Bosse

When I saw this photograph, I fell in love with this beautiful house, which was built around 1910 and is still standing in Highland Park. Read more about it in the Flashback Dallas post from 2016, “The House at Crescent & Byron, Highland Park,” here.

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: Dallas Medical College: 1900-1904

dallas-med-college_1903_utswCommerce, near Akard…

by Paula Bosse

Read about the time that Dallas had ELEVEN medical schools, in the 2014 Flashback Dallas post “Dallas Medical College: 1903-1904.”

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: 1880s Rapid Transit

dallas-rapid-transit_cyclone_cook-coll_degolyer_smu-det

by Paula Bosse

The next several weeks will be spent immersed in the gargantuan task of helping my mother sell her house and move, so new posts might be a bit sporadic for a while, and I might be relying on older posts to fill the gaps.

And speaking of “older posts” here’s one from 2016 which I really enjoyed researching: Dallas Rapid Transit, Est. 1888.”

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #8

old-tige_1900_fire-dept-bk_1931_portal

by Paula Bosse

Time for a few more newly-stumbled-across bits and pieces to add to old posts.

The photo above shows Old Tige,” the 600 gallons-per-minute steam pumper, built in 1884, which was in service with the Dallas Fire Department until 1921 (it can be seen today at the Dallas Firefighters Museum). I’ve added this photo to the post Dallas Fire Stations — 1901.” (Source: The Man in the Leather Helmet, A Souvenir Booklet of The Dallas Fire Department, 1931, via the Portal to Texas History, here.)

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Below, the aftermath of the 1957 tornado that hit Oak Cliff, with the damaged Kessler Theater in the center. This detail of a larger photo has been added to “Back When the Kessler Couldn’t Catch a Break — 1957.” (Source: Squire Haskins photograph, from the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries — the full very large photo can be seen by clicking the thumbnail image here.)

kessler_tornado_squire-haskins_UTA_det

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This 1956 photo of the small Statue of Liberty replica presented to the State Fair of Texas by the Boy Scouts of Circle Ten Council on July 4, 1950 has been added to Fair Park’s Statue of Liberty.” (Source: eBay)

fair-park_statue-of-liberty_ebay_stamped-1956

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This ad for Victory Huts has been added to World War II ‘Victory Huts’ at Parkland.” (Source: Texas Historical Commission Flickr stream)

victory-huts_texas-historical-commission_flickr

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This ad for radio stations WFAA/KGKO is being added to the post WFAA & WBAP’s Unusual Broadcasting Alliance.” (Source: 1941-42 Texas Almanac, via the Portal to Texas History)

wfaa_kgko_tx-almanac_1941-42_portal

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This postcard showing the famous Wilson & Co. Clydesdales has been added to Wilson & Co., Their Clydesdales, and the Dallas Jaycees’ Safety Committee — 1951.” (Source: eBay)

wilson-co_clydesdales_1936_ebay

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This photo of Station No. 11 at Cedar Springs and Reagan (which opened in 1909 and is still in operation!) has been added to No. 4 Hook and Ladder Company, Oak Lawn — 1909.” (Source: The Man in the Leather Helmet, A Souvenir Booklet of The Dallas Fire Department, 1931, via the Portal to Texas History)

cedar-springs_fire-station_fire-dept-bk_1931_portal

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I keep coming across photos of the huge NCR cash register which kept track of attendance at the Texas Centennial. Who doesn’t love a kooky giant cash register? I’ve added these two photos to The Giant Cash Register at the Texas Centennial — 1936.” (Source: George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU: here and here)

tx-centennial_ncr_cook-coll_smu       cash-register_cook-collection_SMU_rau-family_1936

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This photo of Jack Gardner and His Orchestra has been added to the post “‘Meet Me In Dallas’ by Jack Gardner (1915).” (Source: I neglected to note the source and have forgotten!)

gardner-jack_adolphus_crop

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This 1969 ad for the “casual dining” Tex-Mex restaurant opened by singer Trini Lopez on Mockingbird Lane (across from the old Dr Pepper plant and a couple of doors down from Roscoe White’s Corral) has been added to “Trini Lopez: Little Mexico’s Greatest Export.”

trinis_restaurant_031969

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And, lastly, it’s just a tiny addition, but I really like the logo featuring a football helmet; I’ve added it to the post about the Dallas company behind the development of the athletic face mask, The Marietta Mask.”

marietta-mask_envelope

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: Dallas’ Turn-of-the-Century Firehouses — 1901

fire-dept_central-station_main-harwood_1901Main and Harwood, 1901…

by Paula Bosse

Above, the Central Fire Station at Main and Harwood, photographed by Clifton Church and printed in the Dallas Fire Department Annual, 1901. Photos of the other stations — as well as a link to the scanned publication — can be found in the Flashback Dallas post “Dallas Fire Stations — 1901.”

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Copyright © 2018 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

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