Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Category: Vault

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #17

n-m_french-fortnight_stanley-marcus-papers_degolyer-lib_SMU_color_1957Rue de Ervay

by Paula Bosse

It’s time again to insert recently-found stuff into old posts.

The first one, above, is great: it shows the facade which covered the exterior of Neiman-Marcus during the French Fortnight of 1957 — the very first Neiman’s “Fortnight” celebration. I had used a black-and-white version of this photo in the post “Neiman-Marcus Brings France to Big D — 1957,” but I’ve replaced it with this wonderful original color version. (Source: Stanley Marcus Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University — more info on this photo can be found here)

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The next image comes from a postcard showing a path and a footbridge in Sullivan Park — it has been added to “City Park Construction Work — 1941.” The reason it’s been added there is because it’s the only post which mentions “Sullivan Park,” the blink-and-it-and-you’ll-miss-it period when City Park changed its name (it changed back to “City Park” in 1941 after only about 5 years)  — the main photo of that post shows construction work in (let’s call it) Sullivan Park. I’m pretty sure this is the bridge I wrote about in the post “Iola Bridge.” (Source: eBay)

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And since we’re in the neighborhood — in fact right next door — here are a couple of images I’ve come across showing what most of us probably knew as the Ambassador Hotel (RIP). Below are postcards from its second incarnation as the Park Hotel, and a “now-you-see-it-now-you-don’t” view of S. Ervay, before and after the 2019 fire that destroyed the 115-year-old building. They’ve been added to the post “The Majestic Hotel/The Park Hotel/The Ambassador Hotel: R.I.P. — 1904-2019.” (Sources: the postcards are from eBay, and the 2018 and 2021 images are from Google Street View)

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And speaking of hotels, here’s a grainy Dallas Morning News photo of the Stoneleigh under construction in 1923 with a caption offering some tidbits about the swanky new “eleven-story affair” — they’ve been added to “The Stoneleigh Court Apartment Hotel — 1923/1924.” (Source: Dallas Morning News, April 22, 1923)

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I really enjoyed writing about the Brown Cracker Co. which occupied an imposing building in the West End. I’ve added the picture below to the post “Brown Cracker Co. Cracker Wrappers.” (Source: eBay)

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Here’s a very thin image of a railroad spike commemorating the opening of the new Santa Fe passenger line to Chicago in 1955 — it has been squeezed almost imperceptibly into the already-jam-packed post “White Rock Station. (Source: a nice man in Oklahoma named Joe)

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I’ve added the two postcards below to the post “Beautiful Lake Cliff — ca. 1906” — the first one replaced an inferior example I had used previously, and the other was a new addition. (Source: eBay)

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This 1914 photo of the Wells Fargo office on Main Street has been added to “Start Your Brilliant Career at Dallas Telegraph College — c. 1900.” (Source: Dallas Public Library, Van Orden Western Union Telegraph collection, DPL Dallas History and Archives Division, Call Number PA2007-2/2)

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And, lastly, really wishing I had some barbecue, a matchbook from Red Bryan’s which has been added to “Red Bryan’s Smokehouse — BBQ, Oak Cliff-Style.” (Source: eBay)

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Dallas, Center of the Universe — 1920s

ad-dallas-chamber-of-commerce_tx-almanac_1929-det“I’m ready for my closeup, Mr. DeMille…”

by Paula Bosse

If you’ve noticed I’ve been posting very, very little over the past few weeks, it’s because I’ve been dealing with medical issues of a family member, and it’s pretty much taken over my life at this point. I hope to get back to regular posting soon. 

Here is a Dallas Chamber of Commerce ad from 1929 which pretty much tells you all you need to know about how the city of Dallas sees itself in the grand scheme of things. See another very booster-y ad from the same period in the Flashback Dallas post from 2015, “‘A City Built On the Solid Rock of Service’ — 1927.”

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Learn a Trade at Crozier Tech — 1946

crozier-tech_woodworking_cook-coll_degolyer_SMUAnyone for woodworking?

by Paula Bosse

Take a look back at some of the incredible vocational opportunities once offered to Dallas high school students in the 2018 Flashback Dallas post “Crozier Technical High School — ca. 1946.” Enjoy all the great photos (one of which shows a girl in a sculpture class who looks so much like me that it kind of freaks me out every time I see it). (Incidentally, the “me” of 1946 would have had a huge crush on the woodworking guy of 1946. We could have made beautiful sculptures and/or pergolas together.)

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Hangin’ at White Rock — 1972

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by Paula Bosse

On this holiday, a flashback to the White Rock Lake of yesteryear in the post “Lazy Weekends, Cruising White Rock Lake — 1972.” Enjoy the day!

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #16

gill-well-natatorium_texas-swimming-and-diving-hall-of-fameNatatorium habitués… (via Texas Swimming and Diving Hall of Fame)

by Paula Bosse

Time for more cleaning-out of bulging digital files — to keep everything together, I’m adding recently-found images to old posts.

First is the GREAT postcard above which shows some healthy patrons of the Gill Well Natatorium (once located along Maple Avenue, between the MKT tracks and Reverchon Park). I’ve added it to the post “The Gill Well,” which remains one of my favorite Flashback Dallas posts. Many thanks to Charles Logan, the curator of the Texas Swimming and Diving Hall of Fame, who shared this item from their collection.

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This William Langley photo of two softball players and has been added to the post “Girls’ Softball in Dallas, Hugely Popular,” which is among my favorites, if only because it contains the list of names of players from the 1943 league championship team, the Metzger Dairy Maids — lest we forget: Tinker Tarker, Mutt McFanning, and Pud Adams. (Source: Birdville Historical Society, via Portal to Texas History)

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Added to “The Dunbar Branch: Dallas’ First Library for the African-American Community, 1931-1959” is the ad below which features an, admittedly, super-grainy photo — but I was excited to stumble across it, so in it goes! (Source: 1958 Lincoln High School yearbook — the year before the library closed)

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This 1921 ad for the Oriental Art Co. has been added to “‘Enemy Aliens’ and the WWII Internment Camp at Seagoville,” (I didn’t know there were internment camps in Texas — much less that there was one in Dallas County! — until I wrote this post in 2017.) The owners of the Oriental Art Co. — longtime residents of Dallas — experienced both racial prejudice as well as an outpouring of community support during World War II. 

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I don’t usually post watermarked photos, but I’ve got a ton of Texlite-related images in the post “Texlite, Borich, Pegasus,” so why not this circa-1930 photo? Texlite was the Dallas neon-sign-maker-supreme responsible for, among many dazzling creations, the Flying Red Horse atop the Magnolia Building. (Source: Dallas Public Library, Call Number PA87-1/19-59-36)

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This 1967 Christmas-season ad (which is somehow devoid of exclamation marks) (…we’re not talking Nutcracker here…) has been added to a post with perhaps my lengthiest title, “The Lighthouse Church That Warned of Sin’s Penalty with a Beam of Blue Mercury Vapor Shot Into the Skies Above Oak Cliff — 1941.”

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This photo has been added to “Teatro Panamericano/Cine Festival — 1943-1981” — it shows the Dallas Little Theatre before it became a Spanish-language theater and, later, an underground arthouse. (Source: DeGolyer Library, SMU)

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And lastly, a couple of postcards showing the super-cool lighting display at the Texas Centennial/Pan-American Exposition (featuring the Hall of State and the Administration Building at Fair Park) have been added to “Albert Einstein ‘Threw the Switch’ in New Jersey to Open the Pan-American Exposition in Dallas — 1937.” (Source: Baylor University Flickr stream and eBay)

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #15

streetcar_belmont_color_ebaySorry, “Llano only…”

by Paula Bosse

Time for another round-up of miscellaneous photos I’ve come across over the past few months and which I’m adding to previous posts.

First, the photo above, showing a Belmont streetcar, has been added to the post “Ghost Rails of the Belmont Streetcar Line.” I’m not sure where or when the photo was taken, but it makes me very happy to see an actual streetcar which would have traveled through the neighborhood I grew up in. (Source: eBay)

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The photo below, showing Marvin’s Drug Store (aka the Rowan Building) on the northwest corner of Main and Akard, has been added to “Marvin’s Drug Store, Main and Akard.” (Source: eBay)

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This photo of the Haskell Exchange Building has been added to “The Haskell Exchange — ca. 1910.” (Source: Dallas Historical Society)

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Below, a photo of Wigton’s Sandwich Shop, which was located near one of my least favorite 3-point intersections in Dallas (East Grand-Gaston-Garland Road, near White Rock Lake), joins another photo of the same establishment in the post “Orphaned Factoids: Year-End Grab Bag, 2017.” (Source: eBay)

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I love the long-forgotten “waiting station” which was adjacent to the Jefferson Hotel and faced Union Station across Ferris Plaza. I’m adding two photos to “Ferris Plaza Waiting Station — 1925-1950.” (Sources: first one is from eBay, second one is a cropped image from the DeGolyer Library, SMU)

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Two images of the Cabana have been added to “The Cabana Motor Hotel of Dallas.” (Sources: both are from UTA’s Squire Haskins Collection — more info on the first (cropped) image can be found here, and on the second one here)

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This 1958 ad for Texas Instruments (when it was located on Lemmon Avenue, near Love Field) mentions hyperbolic paraboloids, which means that it has, of course, been added to a weirdly popular post, “The Hyperbolic Paraboloids of the Prairie.” (Source: eBay)

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Two 1964 photos of Jack Ruby pal/roomie George Senator have been added to “Newly Discovered Footage of Jack Ruby — 1960.” (Source: Associated Press)

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Two images of a Mystic Revellers invitation from Dallas’ first Mardi Gras celebration in 1876 have been added to “Mardi Gras: ‘Our First Attempt at a Carnival Fete’ — 1876.” (Source: Memphis Public Libraries, Colton Greene Collection)

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This 1936 Coca-Cola ad which ran during the Centennial has been added to “‘The Pause That Refreshes at the Texas Centennial’ — 1936.” because I had previously had only part of the full-page ad. (Source: eBay)

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And these last two are replacing other photos already used. The first one, from 1924, showing Knox Street looking southeasterly from Travis, replaces a previously used photo which had part of the image on the right side (with the horse) cropped out. It’s been added to “Knox Street, Between Cole and Travis.” (Source: DeGolyer Library, SMU

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And, finally, this photo, which shows the Woolworth store, at the northwest corner of Main and Stone, and the Praetorian Building (now the site of a giant eyeball) has replaced a tiny, low-resolution image in the post “The Praetorian Building and Its 19th-Century Neighbors.” (Source: Dallas Public Library)

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Copyright © 2021 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: The Sigel’s Sign

sigels-sign_rain_bosse_121520Thirsty?

by Paula Bosse

Chances are pretty good you recognize this sign. Even through raindrops on a car window. That’s what it looked like when I stopped by Sigel’s on Greenville Avenue today. This is what it looked like when I got back to my car.

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See it moving — flashing and bubbling — in a YouTube video, here.

I wrote about this Sigel’s sign in the 2017 post “Historic Neon: The Super-Cool Sigel’s Sign.” Click the link to read about the man behind this fabulous sign, Marvin Sigel, who died in 2019 at the age of 87 (his obituary is here). After I wrote the piece linked above, I received a very nice message from Marvin’s son, David, who told me that Marvin liked the post and was delighted to know how much his work was appreciated.

And it still is! Thank you, Marvin!

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Photos by Paula Bosse, taken Dec. 15, 2020.

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Thanksgiving Celebrations in 19th-Century Dallas

millsap_turkeys_bosse_102112Turkeys crossing the road in Millsap, TX (photo: Paula Bosse)

by Paula Bosse

Another Thanksgiving has arrived. I’ve been busy this Thanksgiving season working with my brother to clear out my late aunt’s home as we prepare to sell it (she died in April of COVID-19, one of many, many reasons this year has been such a difficult one), and, as a result, my updating of this blog has been a little sparse lately. So today’s post will be a look back at Thanksgiving posts from the past.

Flashback Dallas posts tagged “Thanksgiving” are here.

The individual posts are:

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I hope everyone has a safe and happy Thanksgiving. If your celebrations this year aren’t as festive and as full of family and friends as usual, just know that things will (hopefully!) be better next year.

This year I’m thankful that I had my aunt Bettye Jo in my life for as many years as I did. And for everyone else who has lost a loved one in this awful year or suffered hardships they couldn’t have imagined last Thanksgiving: we’ll get through this.

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Sources & Notes

Photo of turkeys crossing the road was taken by me on a drive through Millsap, Texas (Parker County) in October, 2012.

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

VOTE!

election-returns_1928_frank-rogers_dplWatching returns on Elm St. (photo: Dallas Public Library)

by Paula Bosse

Today is Election Day! If you haven’t already gotten out to vote, today is your last chance. Do it!

One of my favorite “discoveries” I’ve stumbled across since doing this blog is learning how Dallasites (and other Americans across the country) once got continuously-updated news of election returns: crowds gathered to watch results which were projected onto the side of a building. The photo above shows people in the early 1920s standing in front of the Dallas Times Herald building (the one with the pillars, at 1305 Elm) watching returns projected from the newspaper offices onto a building across the street. Before TV and radio and 24-hour news coverage, this was the way many large cities kept their citizens informed on election night. 

Read more about that interesting slice of history in the Flashback Dallas post “How Dallas Used To Get Election Returns.”

Also of Election Day interest, check out these posts:

Happy voting!

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Fair Park’s Aquarium (1936-2020)

aquarium_art-institute-of-chicago_1936

by Paula Bosse

Sad  news: it has been announced that the Children’s Aquarium in Fair Park will be closing permanently. The aquarium — the first in Texas — opened in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936. I wrote about the history of the local landmark, which has served Dallas for 84 years, in the 2015 Flashback Dallas post “The Dallas Aquarium: The Building Emblazoned With Seahorses — 1936.” 

This news is almost as upsetting as seeing Big Tex in flames.

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Copyright © 2020 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

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