Flashback : Dallas

A Miscellany: History, Ads, Pop Culture

Category: Vault

From the Vault: Celebrating the 4th of July at White Rock Lake — 1946

july-4th_1946_white-rock-lake
Calling Monsieur Seurat…

by Paula Bosse

One of my all-time favorite Flashback Dallas photos: Dallasites at White Rock Lake enjoying the first Independence Day following World War II. See this photo really big (and there’s a lot to see!) in the original post from 2016, “4th of July at White Rock Lake — 1946.”

Have a happy, safe, and relatively sweat-free Independence Day!

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #11

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by Paula Bosse

Here are a few images I have added to old posts. (Click pictures to see larger images.)

Above, a photo from 1973 by Steve Fitch showing the Chalk Hill Drive-In. (Source: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Transfer from the National Endowment for the Arts) And below, a 1947 photo showing the parking area of the Northwest Hi-Way Drive-In at Northwest Highway and Hillcrest (the view is to the northwest, with Hillcrest running from the lower left corner to the upper right). (Source: Dallas Public Library, George I. Gird Collection) Both photos have been added to the post “Dallas’ First Two Drive-In Theaters — 1941.”

northwest-hi-way_drive-in_DPL_1947

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Speaking of drive-ins, this postcard image featuring a comely Sivils carhop has been added to “Sivils Drive-In, An Oak Cliff Institution: 1940-1967.” (Source: eBay)

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Speaking of food, this matchbook cover has been added to the post “The Filling Station on Greenville Avenue: From Bonnie & Clyde to Legendary Burger Place.” (Source: eBay)

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This photo of the MKT depot and the Katy Flyer is GREAT. I’ve added it and the novelty snapshot of three MKT travelers to the post “Leaving Dallas on the Katy Flyer — ca. 1914.” (Source for both: eBay)

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These two images of an MKT timetable from 1900 have been added to another Katy Flyer post, “M-K-T Railroad’s ‘Katy Flyer Route’ — 1902.” (Source: eBay)

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Have you not heard of the “Caveteria”?! Then hie yourself over to “The Caveteria: ‘Marvelous Food at Moderate Prices.'” (Source: eBay)

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And. lastly, the Keeley Institute was here to help. There were addiction problems-a-plenty in Big D as the 20th century approached. Read about them in the post Under the Paw of the Tiger: Taking the Cocaine, Morphine, and Opium ‘Cure’ — 1890s.” (Source: Dallas Morning News ad, 1899)

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: A Walk Through Downtown — 2017

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So much fantastic architecture!

by Paula Bosse

I visited downtown several times last week, and it’s always nice to be reminded that some of my favorite old buildings in the Central Business District have somehow managed to survive the wrecking ball and/or over-zealous renovators (I’m not sure which is a worse fate). Two years ago I walked around and took some photos of buildings I really love: see them in the 2017 post “Downtown Dallas, Last Week.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Research Challenge!

house_RPPC_1909_ebay
Mission: track down this house’s location….

by Paula Bosse

Some people look at research as tedious, some people look at it as fun. I definitely think it’s fun. I really loved researching the image above, which I approached as a chance to solve a mystery more than anything else: I wondered if I could find out where the house once stood, the only clues being in the message on the postcard — and I did! Read the original post from 2015: “Tracking Down a Photo Location & Discovering a City Pioneer: D. M. Clower, The Man Who Brought the Telephone to Dallas.” Follow along as I chronicle how I figured it out and what Dallas-history resources I used along the way.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

From the Vault: The Dunbar Branch Library

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“North Dallas” before it became “Uptown”

by Paula Bosse

See photos of Dallas’ first public library built to serve the city’s black community in the Flashback Dallas post from 2015, “The Dunbar Branch: Dallas’ First Library for the African-American Community, 1931-1959.”

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Downtown Dallas at Night

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by Paula Bosse

Things have been busy in recent weeks, but I hope to get back to posting more regularly soon!

In the meantime, check out “A Decade of Spectacular Growth for the Dallas Skyline: 1929-1939,” a post from 2014 showing just how much downtown grew (and illuminated itself) in the span of only ten years. The photo above, published in a 1929 issue of The Rotarian magazine, is the “before” image….

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Lunch-Ladies of Yesteryear

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by Paula Bosse

Ah, school lunches. I’m pretty sure the scene above of Dallas school cafeteria workers shelling fresh peas was one not seen in my lifetime. I’m definitely a product of the canned-and-frozen-food era. Check out the post “School Lunches of Yesteryear” for a list of eyebrow-raising delectables from a typical menu offered to Dallas students in the 1920s and ’30s.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: W. W. Orr, Buggy Man of the 1870s and ’80s

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by Paula Bosse

I love this ad from 1878, showing W. W. Orr’s carriage shop at Main and Martin (with an open-air second-floor showroom!). Read about Mr. Orr in the Flashback Dallas post from 2014, “W. W. Orr: Buggies, Phaetons, Carriages — ‘Everything On Wheels!'”

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

From the Vault: Ebby Halliday

ebby_1956_charm_via-candys-dirtphoto: Ebby Halliday Realtors

by Paula Bosse

This fantastic photograph of a 40-something-year-old Ebby Halliday appeared in Charm magazine (“The magazine for women who work”) and shows Ebby in high ’50s fashion, surveying the city that made her very, very wealthy.

I wrote about Ebby Halliday in 2015 the day after her death at the age of 104. I’ve gone back and expanded that post, adding more about the life of one of Dallas’ most successful real estate titans — the post, “Ebby Halliday: 1911-2015” — is here.

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

A Few Photo Additions to Past Posts — #10

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by Paula Bosse

Time again to add bits and pieces of stuff I’ve come across recently to old posts.

The first addition is the photo above, showing a once-familiar site upon approaching Six Flags Over Texas. This has been added to the inexplicably popular “The Hyperbolic Paraboloids of the Prairie.” (Source: Texas Highways magazine Facebook page — 1961 photo by Willis Albarado)

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Below, a photo of the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink eye-popping “ballyhoo” adorning the entrance to the Capitol Theater for the 1936 showing of Marihuana, now a cult classic. (“Weed with roots in hell. Can they take it just once and then quit? Women cry for it, men will slay for it.”) (Movie promotion isn’t what it used to be.) This fantastic photo has been added to one of my favorite posts “‘Delusions of Affability’ — Marijuana in 1930s Dallas.” (Source: George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University) (All images are larger when clicked.)

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This ca. 1875-1880 photo of the R. F. Eisenlohr store and “German pharmacy” (southwest corner of Main and Field) has been added to “The Eisenlohr Family and Dallas’ First Christmas Tree — 1874.” (Source: DeGolyer Library, SMU)

eisenlohr-store_degolyer-lib_SMU

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Nothing all that exciting, perhaps, about this matchbook art, but it’s atmospheric. It’s been added to “Gene’s Music Bar, The Lasso Bar, and the Zoo Bar.” (Source: eBay)

zoo-bar_matchbook_ebay_2     zoo-bar_matchbook_ebay_1

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This article on Dallas’ historic cemeteries near where the current City Hall was built has been added to “The Historic Masonic, Odd Fellows, and City Cemeteries.” (Source: Historic Dallas magazine, July, 1985, via UNT’s Portal to Texas History)

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My family’s neighborhood “special occasion” restaurant was Kirby’s steakhouse on Lower Greenville. I recently came across a 1987 Channel 5 news report on the closing of the long-lived restaurant (it had started out as a Pig Stand in the 1920s). I’ve added this screenshot and the link to the news report (which can be watched here) to the post “My Birthdays at Kirby’s: Filet Mignon for Everyone!” (Source: KXAS-NBC 5 News Collection, UNT Libraries, via the Portal to Texas History)

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The Associated Press photo below — which shows a police officer posing with confiscated contraband seized in raids of the homes of the city’s “enemy aliens” (in this case Germans and Italians) — has been added to the post “‘Enemy Aliens’ and the WWII Internment Camp at Seagoville,” along with a United Press article from Feb., 1942.

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Lubbock Avalanche, Feb. 26, 1942 (click to read)

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Three views of the DP&L power plant because, why not?, has been added to “DP&L’s Twin Smokestacks.”

dallas-power-and-light_degolyer-lib_SMUvia DeGolyer Library, SMU

dpl-plant_towers_squire-haskins_UTAvia Squire Haskins Collection, University of Texas at Arlington

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source unknown

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I keep adding photos of the old East Dallas railroad depot to the post “The Old Union Depot in East Dallas: 1897-1935” — it may be getting a bit much. I’m adding three more anyway.

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via DeGolyer Library, SMU

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via DeGolyer Library, SMU

union-depot_your-dallas-of-tomorrow_1943_portal“Your Dallas of Tomorrow” (1943), Portal to Texas History

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I’ve been contacted by several people who live in the converted factory now known as “2220 Canton” about the (FANTASTIC!) main photo I used in the post “Canton Street: Poultry, Pecans, and Future Luxury Lofts.” Only because I had to figure out where that photo had been taken do I now know about Olive & Myers, the furniture manufacturers who once occupied a sprawling hub of buildings in the Farmers Market area. I’m adding a few images to that post for you, enthusiastic 2220 people.

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ca. 1905, DeGolyer Library, SMU (link lost!)

olive-myers_hist-of-an-opportunity_degolyer-lib_SMU_ca-1910via DeGolyer Library, SMU

olive-myers_legacies_spring-2013Legacies, Spring 2013, via Portal to Texas History

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Centennial ad, June, 1936, above (with very large detail below)

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Copyright © 2019 Paula Bosse. All Rights Reserved.

 

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